written by:
July 13, 2013
Each of these homes incorporates some element that distinguishes it from its neighbors, and represents the success of modern design on the East Coast. Click on through to view a quartet of our favorite homes from Baltimore to Connecticut.
The courtyard divides the "bi-nuclear" house into adult areas and children's areas, including a playroom.

Marcel Breuer Hooper House II

The stone-walled courtyard of this Baltimore home divides it into adult areas and children’s areas.

Photo by: Zubin Shroff

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Originally appeared in Marcel Breuer Hooper House II
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Architect Grant explains that the recessed orange wall with built-in storage shelving is a counterpoint to the view of Boston in the opposite direction.

Urban Usonian

The bright red-orange color of the room pictured here is meant to serve as a visual counterpoint to the Boston cityscape it faces. 

Photo by: Kent Dayton

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Originally appeared in Urban Usonian
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Japanese-inspired design home renovation

New McDonald

With their budget in mind, the McDonald family agreed to the angular living room design pictured here during the renovation of their Rhode Island home, because it shaved off costly square feet. 

Photo by: John Horner

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Courtesy of 
COPYRIGHT 2011, JOHN HORNER
Originally appeared in New McDonald
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Modern aluminum shingle-clad home

A Traditional Shingle-Clad Home in Connecticut

The metal shingles that cover the addition of this Connecticut home are on the cutting edge of modern design.

Photo by: Andrew Rowat

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Originally appeared in A Traditional Shingle-Clad Home in Connecticut
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The courtyard divides the "bi-nuclear" house into adult areas and children's areas, including a playroom.

Marcel Breuer Hooper House II

The stone-walled courtyard of this Baltimore home divides it into adult areas and children’s areas.

Photo by: Zubin Shroff

Photo by Zubin Shroff.

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