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August 2, 2013
Innovative green design meets historical renovation in the world of contemporary German architecture.
JustK Haus interior in Tübingen, Germany

 

Even in a country known for its eco-friendly regulations, the JustK house stands out; its triple-glazed windows and geothermal heat exchanger make it as green as it is modern. 

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© Brigida González, Stuttgart
Originally appeared in Going Deutsch
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Next to the kitchen, Eames and Jacobsen chairs welcome dinner guests to the dining-room table. The back wall is covered in particleboard panels.

 

For a Berlin couple that "hates clutter," a house with a clean, fresh, contemporary interior that did away with unnecessary ornamentation was a must. Photo by Pia Ulin.

 
Photo by 
Originally appeared in A Rational Approach
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neutral colored dining room with concrete walls and floors

 

A 1907 villa in Hamburg was too small and too old-fashioned on its own, but the construction of a modern addition made it the perfect home for a family of four. Photo by Mark Seelen.

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Originally appeared in Paint it Black
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Wall-to-ceiling glass panels on the two exterior walls maximize the views and flood the apartment with light. The interior wall panels can be entirely removed to create a single loft space.

 

Applying modern design to a crumbling German port allowed Norman Foster to rejuvenate a historical city without painting over its industrial past. Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.

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Originally appeared in Industrial Evolution
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JustK Haus interior in Tübingen, Germany

 

Even in a country known for its eco-friendly regulations, the JustK house stands out; its triple-glazed windows and geothermal heat exchanger make it as green as it is modern. 

Image courtesy of © Brigida González, Stuttgart.

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