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Walter Gropius

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It is nearly impossible to overstate the importance of Walter Gropius (1883-1969) to the development of modern architecture. He founded the Bauhaus with Ludwig Mies Van der Rohe where he trained the first great generation of European modernists, then taught at Harvard's Graduate School of Design where he trained the first generation of great American modernists. As a theorist and thinker he laid out the underpinnings of the modernist movement, and as an architect constructed numerous works that stand as exemplars of those ideas. His most important buildings include the Bauhaus School and Faculty in Dessau, Germany; the Gropius House in Lincoln, Massachusetts; the Pan Am Building in New York; the Embassy of the United States in Athens, Greece; and Wayland High School in Wayland, Massachusetts. He founded the Architect's Collaborative in 1945, which would come to be a leading architecture firm, and his furniture designs include the D 51 armchair and the F 51 armchair and sofa.
 

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Architects' House Museums

From Luis Barragán's Mexico City residence to the Alvar Aalto House in Helsinki, we share ten architects' dwellings that are now museums.

mid century modern house by architect A. Quincy Jones

Mid-Century's Greatest Hits

We've featured homes from virtually every continent, in locations as far ranging as busting metropolises to serene suburbs to remote islands, with architectural programs equally as diverse. However, the one style most emblematic of Dwell as a whole seems to be that of the mid-century (the name check in this video at about 30 seconds in is one example). In the following slideshow, view an assortment homes that channel the ethos of the era's architecture, interiors, or progressive design spirit. You'll spy what might be the first modern conversation pit and see a structure whose dramatic seaside locale competes with its sleek high-modern stylings.

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Walter Gropius, Hagerty House

Walter Gropius wanted the Hagerty House, his first commission in the United States, to be as close to the sea as possible. He sited the structure a precarious 20 feet from the shore and let the setting dictate the design.

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