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The Lawn Goodbye

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We sunbathe, picnic, and play sports on them. Our bare feet seem inexorably drawn to them. And for many of us, they’re the first thing we see when we step out the front door: lawns. It’s no surprise they cover 40 million acres in the U.S., or that we spend more caring for them than the entire GDP of Costa Rica.

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  Artist Fritz Haeg is trying to change the way we look at our lawns and illustrate how we might make better use of them. Michael and Jennifer Foti’s once unproductive front yard gets a makeover.  Photo by: Fritz Haeg
    Artist Fritz Haeg is trying to change the way we look at our lawns and illustrate how we might make better use of them. Michael and Jennifer Foti’s once unproductive front yard gets a makeover.

    Photo by: Fritz Haeg

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  The Fotis made friends with neighbors by giving away some of the surplus the new garden produced. Lucky locals walked away with natural delicacies such as white beauty eggplants, Brandywine tomatoes, lemon cucumbers, kumquats, apricots, pears, purple sage, rosemary, and thyme.  Photo by: Fritz Haeg
    The Fotis made friends with neighbors by giving away some of the surplus the new garden produced. Lucky locals walked away with natural delicacies such as white beauty eggplants, Brandywine tomatoes, lemon cucumbers, kumquats, apricots, pears, purple sage, rosemary, and thyme.

    Photo by: Fritz Haeg

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  The various stages of development unfold in the Southern California suburb, illustrating the stark transformation from everyday turf to extraordinary vegetation.  Photo by: Fritz Haeg
    The various stages of development unfold in the Southern California suburb, illustrating the stark transformation from everyday turf to extraordinary vegetation.

    Photo by: Fritz Haeg

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  The house before the edible garden was installed.  Photo by: Fritz Haeg
    The house before the edible garden was installed.

    Photo by: Fritz Haeg

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  The first iteration of the Edible Estates project was initiated on July 4, 2005, at the home of Stan and Priti Cox in Salina, Kansas.  Photo by: Fritz Haeg
    The first iteration of the Edible Estates project was initiated on July 4, 2005, at the home of Stan and Priti Cox in Salina, Kansas.

    Photo by: Fritz Haeg

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