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Best Modern Desert Houses

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Few climates offer the extreme heat and extreme cold (all in one day) of the desert. Throw in the fact that they're sparsely populated, offer few municipal services, and are often in the middle of nowhere and you've got the perfect recipe for innovative, off-the-grid architecture. In our Elements Issue, we took a look at homes designed for all climes; here are our favorite modern houses in the desert.
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  With this elegant steel prototype, Marmol Radziner and Associates launch a new prefab venture with the goal of bringing their modern design sensibilities to a broader market. Photo by: Daniel Hennessy  Photo by: Daniel HennessyCourtesy of: Daniel Hennessy
    With this elegant steel prototype, Marmol Radziner and Associates launch a new prefab venture with the goal of bringing their modern design sensibilities to a broader market. Photo by: Daniel Hennessy

    Photo by: Daniel Hennessy

    Courtesy of: Daniel Hennessy

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  Architect Lloyd Russell’s design for this desert getaway passively mitigates the elements with a utilitarian solution, turning a modest modern retreat into a hardy, region-appropriate home. Photo by:  

    Architect Lloyd Russell’s design for this desert getaway passively mitigates the elements with a utilitarian solution, turning a modest modern retreat into a hardy, region-appropriate home. Photo by: 

     

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  The iT House brings together raw industrial aesthetics with the tactics of green design to forge a new home in the sunbaked wilds of California’s east. Photo by: Gregg Segal   Photo by: Gregg Segal

    The iT House brings together raw industrial aesthetics with the tactics of green design to forge a new home in the sunbaked wilds of California’s east. Photo by: Gregg Segal

     

    Photo by: Gregg Segal

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  Rosie Joe’s off-the-grid house was the first project built in the Navajo Nation by DesignBuildBLUFF, a nonprofit organization affiliated with the University of Utah’s College of Architecture + Planning, that Louis directs with a group of first-year graduate students. Photo by: Daniel Hennessy  Photo by: Daniel Hennessy

    Rosie Joe’s off-the-grid house was the first project built in the Navajo Nation by DesignBuildBLUFF, a nonprofit organization affiliated with the University of Utah’s College of Architecture + Planning, that Louis directs with a group of first-year graduate students. Photo by: Daniel Hennessy

    Photo by: Daniel Hennessy

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  The Blue Sky prototype home tiptoes gracefully across the desert landscape just north of Joshua Tree National Park. Nestled amid piñon and juniper trees and outcroppings of boulders, the house’s six steel columns permit a seasonal stream to run underneath it. Photo by: Misha Gravenor  Photo by: Misha Gravenor

    The Blue Sky prototype home tiptoes gracefully across the desert landscape just north of Joshua Tree National Park. Nestled amid piñon and juniper trees and outcroppings of boulders, the house’s six steel columns permit a seasonal stream to run underneath it. Photo by: Misha Gravenor

    Photo by: Misha Gravenor

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