7 Innovative Rooftops

written by:
May 13, 2013
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  Real estate developer Matt Blesso enlisted the help of Yale professors Joel Sanders and Diana Balmori to bring to life his vision of a rooftop garden despite being in the hustle and bustle of New York. Accented by modern décor, the rooftop becomes a clear reflection of the trendy cool of Manhattan. Photo via Inhabitat.

    Real estate developer Matt Blesso enlisted the help of Yale professors Joel Sanders and Diana Balmori to bring to life his vision of a rooftop garden despite being in the hustle and bustle of New York. Accented by modern décor, the rooftop becomes a clear reflection of the trendy cool of Manhattan. Photo via Inhabitat.

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  Evoking both nature and the nurture of relaxation, this rooftop deck by Pulltab Design shows that roof gardens and entertaining spaces don’t have to be mutually exclusive. For this roof, Earth tones and wood are key components to achieving a spa-like atmosphere. Photo via Oliver Yaphe.

    Evoking both nature and the nurture of relaxation, this rooftop deck by Pulltab Design shows that roof gardens and entertaining spaces don’t have to be mutually exclusive. For this roof, Earth tones and wood are key components to achieving a spa-like atmosphere. Photo via Oliver Yaphe.

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  Lacking in outdoor space, Toronto realtor Kara Reed’s condo was in need of a revamp. To give her a place to entertain, Terry Ryan of Cubic Yard Design helped turn her roof into a working backyard of her own—complete with an outdoor kitchen. Contemporary-rustic furniture, accents serving as pops of color, wood, and plenty of sprawling greenery make this rooftop a place of refuge. Photo via Style At Home.

    Lacking in outdoor space, Toronto realtor Kara Reed’s condo was in need of a revamp. To give her a place to entertain, Terry Ryan of Cubic Yard Design helped turn her roof into a working backyard of her own—complete with an outdoor kitchen. Contemporary-rustic furniture, accents serving as pops of color, wood, and plenty of sprawling greenery make this rooftop a place of refuge. Photo via Style At Home.

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  This “secret garden” in our Bar Method story becomes a hidden trove for the Jorgensen family. Designed by Jonathan Feldman of Feldman Architecture, the Menlo Park home features a master suite that looks out over the green roof. Photo by: Joe Fletcher  Photo by Joe Fletcher.   This originally appeared in Bar Method.

    This “secret garden” in our Bar Method story becomes a hidden trove for the Jorgensen family. Designed by Jonathan Feldman of Feldman Architecture, the Menlo Park home features a master suite that looks out over the green roof. Photo by: Joe Fletcher

    Photo by Joe Fletcher.
    This originally appeared in Bar Method.
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  Designed by Levitt Goodman Architects, the Euclid Avenue house in Toronto proves that a green roof can be integrated into any space, despite limited surface area. Photo via Contemporist.

    Designed by Levitt Goodman Architects, the Euclid Avenue house in Toronto proves that a green roof can be integrated into any space, despite limited surface area. Photo via Contemporist.

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  In our Smaller in Texas story, Stacey Hill’s shipping container studio—designed by Texas architect Jim Poteet—is complete with a rooftop garden that adds extra color to the navy exterior and orange accent pieces. Photo by: Chris Cooper  Photo by Chris Cooper.   This originally appeared in Smaller in Texas.

    In our Smaller in Texas story, Stacey Hill’s shipping container studio—designed by Texas architect Jim Poteet—is complete with a rooftop garden that adds extra color to the navy exterior and orange accent pieces. Photo by: Chris Cooper

    Photo by Chris Cooper.
    This originally appeared in Smaller in Texas.
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  The Villa Bio in our It Takes a Villa house tour is truly straight out of the future—the sleek home was designed by Enric Ruiz-Geli’s firm Cloud9 and features a hydroponic rooftop garden growing out of volcanic stones that absorbs excess runoff. Photo by: Gunnar Knechtel      Photo by Gunnar Knechtel.   This originally appeared in It Takes a Villa.

    The Villa Bio in our It Takes a Villa house tour is truly straight out of the future—the sleek home was designed by Enric Ruiz-Geli’s firm Cloud9 and features a hydroponic rooftop garden growing out of volcanic stones that absorbs excess runoff. Photo by: Gunnar Knechtel

     

     

    Photo by Gunnar Knechtel.
    This originally appeared in It Takes a Villa.
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