5 Green Homes from Dwell's April Outdoors Issue

written by:
March 26, 2014
Dwell's April 2014 issue is now on newsstands—here's a sneak peek of the intelligent homes, outdoor products, and green building methods you'll see in its pages.
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  For her largest commission to date, young San Francisco architect Mary Barensfeld channels Tadao Ando to create an outdoor room for a couple in the Berkeley Hills. A small, raised terrace outfitted with an H 55 easy chair by Björn Hultén offers a view of the San Francisco Bay. Photo by Joe Fletcher.   Photo by: Joe Fletcher

    For her largest commission to date, young San Francisco architect Mary Barensfeld channels Tadao Ando to create an outdoor room for a couple in the Berkeley Hills. A small, raised terrace outfitted with an H 55 easy chair by Björn Hultén offers a view of the San Francisco Bay. Photo by Joe Fletcher. 

    Photo by: Joe Fletcher

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  An especially compelling material detail from Dwell's Mary Barensfeld garden story is a pair of Cor-Ten steel screens. The architect used a computer to generate the circular patterns that were carved with a water-jet cutte, and the perforations allow light and the green of the surrounding Koi bamboo to filter into the space while preserving privacy. Photo by Joe Fletcher.  Photo by: Joe Fletcher

    An especially compelling material detail from Dwell's Mary Barensfeld garden story is a pair of Cor-Ten steel screens. The architect used a computer to generate the circular patterns that were carved with a water-jet cutte, and the perforations allow light and the green of the surrounding Koi bamboo to filter into the space while preserving privacy. Photo by Joe Fletcher.

    Photo by: Joe Fletcher

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  Though diminutive in size, the 125-square-foot backyard structure architect Jerome A. Levin designed for his family on Long Island has lofty ambitions. “I wanted to create a place that feels like it has no connection to the world it stems from,” Levin says. Photo by Dustin Cohen.  Photo by: Dustin Cohen

    Though diminutive in size, the 125-square-foot backyard structure architect Jerome A. Levin designed for his family on Long Island has lofty ambitions. “I wanted to create a place that feels like it has no connection to the world it stems from,” Levin says. Photo by Dustin Cohen.

    Photo by: Dustin Cohen

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  Thanks to an earth-moving renovation, a hillside Virginia home located on a notch between two ridges becomes a place for play and repose. The landscape design, by Anna Boeschenstein of Grounded, followed a 2,200-square-foot extension by Formwork architects Robert and Cecilia H. Nichols. The front door is painted in Chinese Red by Sherwin-Williams. Photo by Eli Meir Kaplan.  Photo by: Eli Meir Kaplan

    Thanks to an earth-moving renovation, a hillside Virginia home located on a notch between two ridges becomes a place for play and repose. The landscape design, by Anna Boeschenstein of Grounded, followed a 2,200-square-foot extension by Formwork architects Robert and Cecilia H. Nichols. The front door is painted in Chinese Red by Sherwin-Williams. Photo by Eli Meir Kaplan.

    Photo by: Eli Meir Kaplan

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  An outdoor shower in the lower courtyard of the Virginia home includes most of the materials that define the project, including Cor-Ten steel posts, horizontal ipe slats and decking, a custom seat and towel shelf set into a natural boulder, and concrete pavers. Photo by Eli Meir Kaplan.  Photo by: Eli Meir Kaplan

    An outdoor shower in the lower courtyard of the Virginia home includes most of the materials that define the project, including Cor-Ten steel posts, horizontal ipe slats and decking, a custom seat and towel shelf set into a natural boulder, and concrete pavers. Photo by Eli Meir Kaplan.

    Photo by: Eli Meir Kaplan

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  An ipe deck slopes sharply skyward behind this house in Menlo Park, California, creating a secluded backyard getaway that feels like an outdoor extension of a living room. Brennan Cox of Groundworks Office is responsible for the transformative design. Photo by Ike Edeani.  Photo by: Ike EdeaniCourtesy of: Ike Edeani

    An ipe deck slopes sharply skyward behind this house in Menlo Park, California, creating a secluded backyard getaway that feels like an outdoor extension of a living room. Brennan Cox of Groundworks Office is responsible for the transformative design. Photo by Ike Edeani.

    Photo by: Ike Edeani

    Courtesy of: Ike Edeani

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  Architect Andrew Heid of NOA created this long-term home in Oregon for his parents around a glass enclosure built to celebrate the surrounding greenery. The Heids incorporated mostly native plants into the courtyard, which Andrew designed as an ovoid decagon. Photo by Iwan Baan.  Photo by: Iwan Baan

    Architect Andrew Heid of NOA created this long-term home in Oregon for his parents around a glass enclosure built to celebrate the surrounding greenery. The Heids incorporated mostly native plants into the courtyard, which Andrew designed as an ovoid decagon. Photo by Iwan Baan.

    Photo by: Iwan Baan

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  Surrounded by a canopy of trees, the house is bordered by a deep overhang that matches the width of the concrete terrace. “What I like is that the decks and the courtyard are visually part of the house, but they’re outdoor spaces,” says Ted. Heid worked with Curtis Bosworth and John Weed of WBS Construction on the project. Photo by Iwan Baan.  Photo by: Iwan Baan

    Surrounded by a canopy of trees, the house is bordered by a deep overhang that matches the width of the concrete terrace. “What I like is that the decks and the courtyard are visually part of the house, but they’re outdoor spaces,” says Ted. Heid worked with Curtis Bosworth and John Weed of WBS Construction on the project. Photo by Iwan Baan.

    Photo by: Iwan Baan

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