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10 Ways to Landscape With Pavers

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Fall is upon us and the branches are beginning to grow bare, so there’s no better time than now to focus on your hardscape. Here are 10 ways to incorporate pavers into the modern garden.
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  At the New Canaan, Connecticut, home of Craig Bassam and Scott Fellows, designed in 1955 by noted modernist architect Willis N. Mills, Bassam replaced the terrace's concrete pavers with bluestone and removed a concrete-block wall.    

    At the New Canaan, Connecticut, home of Craig Bassam and Scott Fellows, designed in 1955 by noted modernist architect Willis N. Mills, Bassam replaced the terrace's concrete pavers with bluestone and removed a concrete-block wall.

     

     

     

     

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  A Bay Area landscape designer works her yard like a jigsaw puzzle, packing a bevy of distinctive destinations into a steep and diminutive plot. Granite pavers salvaged by Wagner from a museum installation line the dining patio, where the couple frequently host dinner parties. The table and benches are from Modern Outdoor.Photo by Morgan Rachel Levy.   Photo by: Morgan Rachel Levy

    A Bay Area landscape designer works her yard like a jigsaw puzzle, packing a bevy of distinctive destinations into a steep and diminutive plot. Granite pavers salvaged by Wagner from a museum installation line the dining patio, where the couple frequently host dinner parties. The table and benches are from Modern Outdoor.Photo by Morgan Rachel Levy. 

    Photo by: Morgan Rachel Levy

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  A family matriarch enlisted an architect, an interior designer, a builder, and a landscape architect to help realize her vision for a diminutive, low-key lakeside getaway in Texas. Landscape architect Tait Moring installed pavers around the structure’s perimeter and kept the tree cover intact. Photo by Kimberly Davis. 

    A family matriarch enlisted an architect, an interior designer, a builder, and a landscape architect to help realize her vision for a diminutive, low-key lakeside getaway in Texas. Landscape architect Tait Moring installed pavers around the structure’s perimeter and kept the tree cover intact. Photo by Kimberly Davis. 

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  Nelson Byrd Woltz carves out a vertical garden for a New York City residence and, in the process, creates a nest for its human and avian inhabitants. B&B Italia Outdoor’s Canasta sofa, by Patricia Urquiola, shares a shady patch in the ground-floor Carnegie Hill garden with three ginkgo biloba trees, an existing fountain with an Italian marble spout designed by Thomas Woltz, and bluestone pavers. The terrace is filled with woodland greenery: Leucothoe, ostrich ferns, and lady ferns. Photo by Eric Piasecki.   Photo by: Eric Piasecki

    Nelson Byrd Woltz carves out a vertical garden for a New York City residence and, in the process, creates a nest for its human and avian inhabitants. B&B Italia Outdoor’s Canasta sofa, by Patricia Urquiola, shares a shady patch in the ground-floor Carnegie Hill garden with three ginkgo biloba trees, an existing fountain with an Italian marble spout designed by Thomas Woltz, and bluestone pavers. The terrace is filled with woodland greenery: Leucothoe, ostrich ferns, and lady ferns. Photo by Eric Piasecki. 

    Photo by: Eric Piasecki

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  Mill Valley, California, might not be a hotbed of modernism, but it was here, ten years ago, that Dwell came into the world alongside founder Lara Hedberg Deam’s first home—now renovated by her husband, Chris Deam. A path created with Stepstone's narrow concrete pavers meanders through the garden past the master bedroom. Photo by Dustin Aksland.   Photo by: Dustin Aksland

    Mill Valley, California, might not be a hotbed of modernism, but it was here, ten years ago, that Dwell came into the world alongside founder Lara Hedberg Deam’s first home—now renovated by her husband, Chris Deam. A path created with Stepstone's narrow concrete pavers meanders through the garden past the master bedroom. Photo by Dustin Aksland. 

    Photo by: Dustin Aksland

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  Rather than resist the natural slope of the Buena Vista Heights backyard, landscape architect Eric Blasen composed a well-considered, minimal, multiterraced space. Accent details, like the flat handrail and stone stairs, mirror those repeated both inside the home and out front, respectively; Blasen worked directly with architect Tim Gemmill to ensure a cohesive feel between the spaces. Photo by Marion Brenner.   Photo by: Marion Brenner

    Rather than resist the natural slope of the Buena Vista Heights backyard, landscape architect Eric Blasen composed a well-considered, minimal, multiterraced space. Accent details, like the flat handrail and stone stairs, mirror those repeated both inside the home and out front, respectively; Blasen worked directly with architect Tim Gemmill to ensure a cohesive feel between the spaces. Photo by Marion Brenner. 

    Photo by: Marion Brenner

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  Instead of installing a typical cement slab driveway at their Portland, Oregon, home, Waechter and Crymes opted for concrete pavers mixed with patches of Corsican mint that let rainwater permeate into the ground. Photo by Shawn Records.   Photo by: Shawn Records

    Instead of installing a typical cement slab driveway at their Portland, Oregon, home, Waechter and Crymes opted for concrete pavers mixed with patches of Corsican mint that let rainwater permeate into the ground. Photo by Shawn Records. 

    Photo by: Shawn Records

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  In Arlington, Virginia, architecture firm Höweler + Yoon contends with spatial and budgetary constraints to carve a microcourtyard, complete with Japanese maples and a cascading concrete fountain, in just 200 square feet. Red Head fountain grass and Aoba Jo and Beni Ubi Gohon dwarf Japanese maples—from the Merrifield Garden Center surround the fountain. Eventually, the fountain will hold koi. The firm created a wheelchair-friendly side walkway with a gentle slope. The path is lined with Silver Lake quartzite flagstone pavers Hannah selected from the Charles Luck Stone Center. 

    In Arlington, Virginia, architecture firm Höweler + Yoon contends with spatial and budgetary constraints to carve a microcourtyard, complete with Japanese maples and a cascading concrete fountain, in just 200 square feet. Red Head fountain grass and Aoba Jo and Beni Ubi Gohon dwarf Japanese maples—from the Merrifield Garden Center surround the fountain. Eventually, the fountain will hold koi. The firm created a wheelchair-friendly side walkway with a gentle slope. The path is lined with Silver Lake quartzite flagstone pavers Hannah selected from the Charles Luck Stone Center. 

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  Mint Plaza in San Francisco used to be a highly sketchy back alley. Today, thanks to a rethinking by CMG Landscape Architecture, it's a vibrant public pedestrian plaza and festival space lined with restaurants and cafes, filled with dozens of movable bright orange chairs and shaded by a vine-covered steel trellis on a bed of concrete pavers. 

    Mint Plaza in San Francisco used to be a highly sketchy back alley. Today, thanks to a rethinking by CMG Landscape Architecture, it's a vibrant public pedestrian plaza and festival space lined with restaurants and cafes, filled with dozens of movable bright orange chairs and shaded by a vine-covered steel trellis on a bed of concrete pavers. 

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  Austin-based architectural photographer Patrick Wong, who holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in architecture, asked the firm Cottam Hargrave for help in designing and building a live/work space on land he had purchased years ago from his grandfather. Wong consulted with an old neighbor, Austin-based landscape architect Eleanor McKinney, on landscaping, and she steered him toward a maintenance-free hardscape, which Wong designed himself with crushed granite, square pavers and limestone and basalt boulders from Austin Stone Supply. The lawn was already in place and never needs water, notes Wong. Photo by Patrick Wong.   Photo by: Patrick WongCourtesy of: ©2009 Patrick Y. WongCopyright Case # 1-266025680 Filed October 27, 2009

    Austin-based architectural photographer Patrick Wong, who holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in architecture, asked the firm Cottam Hargrave for help in designing and building a live/work space on land he had purchased years ago from his grandfather. Wong consulted with an old neighbor, Austin-based landscape architect Eleanor McKinney, on landscaping, and she steered him toward a maintenance-free hardscape, which Wong designed himself with crushed granite, square pavers and limestone and basalt boulders from Austin Stone Supply. The lawn was already in place and never needs water, notes Wong. Photo by Patrick Wong. 

    Photo by: Patrick Wong

    Courtesy of: ©2009 Patrick Y. WongCopyright Case # 1-266025680 Filed October 27, 2009

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