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March 19, 2014
Wishing to preserve existing sites and the natural beauty of original trees, these seven homes use nature as their centerpiece.
The tension between old and new is easy to see in Prague, where Art Deco housing butts up uncomfortably with utilitarian tower blocks left behind after the Soviet invasion of 1968. Even the homeowners’ attitude reflects this. “I’m used to that antique sty

The swooping concrete roof of the EggO house in Prague, moors the property to the land. Upreaching spruce and apple trees show that reaching up requires a firm foundation. Photo by Jens Passoth.

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Originally appeared in EggO Centric
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The 300-year-old beech tree supplies shade, movement, sound, and color to the site, and provides a towering natural counterpoint to the renovated home's long, low expanses of glass.

In their search for a home in Ghent, Belgium, an architect and his partner fell in love with a spectacular 300-year-old beech tree in the former deer park of a chateau on the city's outskirts. Moved by the tree, the couple bought the home appended to the property. Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.

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Originally appeared in The Tree of Ghent
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Finally, the stone pine tree reveals itself from the backyard looking over the Venice neighborhood. Its canopy stretches over the first floor of the home and can be glimpsed by the skylights placed strategically above the living area.

Struck by the comfort and majesty of a stone pine tree on his home's Venice, California, lot, principal Daniel Monti of Modal Design sought to echo the qualities of the tree in his three bedroom family home. Photo by Benny Chan.

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© fotoworks
Originally appeared in The Giving Tree
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For this San Diego family, the phrase "putting down roots" has taken on a whole new meaning.

Getting to keep the now over-50-foot-tall podocarpus tree on their inherited San Diego lot encouraged the Lee family to accept the plans of architectural firm Public Architecture and Planning. For the Lees, the redesign began with staying in touch with their roots. Photo by Noah Webb.

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Originally appeared in The Family Tree
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Casa serpiente semi covered walkway

The scarcity of rain in Lima, Peru, renders trees precious commodities. But the trees studding the property of the resident of Casa Serpiente have a profounder importance; his house is built around the trees of his childhood backyard. Photo by Cristóbal Palma.

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Cristobal Palma
Originally appeared in A Modern Concrete Home in Peru
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A wider view of the bridge that "will strengthen the floating concept of this house," according to Wibowo.

In honor of their son's return, a couple in Indonesia expanded their home. Connecting the addition to the main house, an arboretum and breezeway also serves as a garage, storing the father's motorcycles. Photos by Deny Wibowo and Pandji Vasco.

Originally appeared in Bridging Old & New in Indonesia
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To reconnect back to the fallen tree, the architects carved a portal in the walnut floor, affording a view of the inspiration for the house itself.

After falling over at the rear of a Brentwood estate in Los Angeles, a 40-year-old pine tree continued to grow. Inspired by the tree's resilience, the property owner built a guesthouse around the tree. This window shows the source behind the structure's conception. Photo by Eric Staudenmaier.

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Originally appeared in An Atypical Tree House
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The tension between old and new is easy to see in Prague, where Art Deco housing butts up uncomfortably with utilitarian tower blocks left behind after the Soviet invasion of 1968. Even the homeowners’ attitude reflects this. “I’m used to that antique sty

The swooping concrete roof of the EggO house in Prague, moors the property to the land. Upreaching spruce and apple trees show that reaching up requires a firm foundation. Photo by Jens Passoth.

Photo by Jens Passoth.

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