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Village People

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Amidst the pedestrian-friendly maze of leafy streets in New York City’s West Village, LOT-EK, a firm whose designs focus on the creative reuse of industrial materials, inserted a gut-renovated and intensely colorful new home—getting a facade embedded with truck beds past the heritage commission along the way.

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  Lawrence Weiner sits at his daylit desk. The bare walls are perfect for tacking 
up new projects, and the steel ductwork gives the space an industrious feel.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    Lawrence Weiner sits at his daylit desk. The bare walls are perfect for tacking up new projects, and the steel ductwork gives the space an industrious feel.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  Even with the reused truck bodies creating large windows in the facade, the house still cuts a trim figure on the street. The rooftop garden is hidden from the sidewalk.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    Even with the reused truck bodies creating large windows in the facade, the house still cuts a trim figure on the street. The rooftop garden is hidden from the sidewalk.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

  • 
  Lawrence and Alice confer in the ground-floor kitchen. Traces of color are visible everywhere, including the orange-and-yellow curtains and pink coathooks.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    Lawrence and Alice confer in the ground-floor kitchen. Traces of color are visible everywhere, including the orange-and-yellow curtains and pink coathooks.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  The Weiners sit in one of the many large window bays, showing how the reused truck bodies look from within.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    The Weiners sit in one of the many large window bays, showing how the reused truck bodies look from within.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  The huge master bathroom includes a fully accessible walk-in shower.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    The huge master bathroom includes a fully accessible walk-in shower.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  The back garden includes fragments of stone from the earlier building.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    The back garden includes fragments of stone from the earlier building.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  A collection of objects from Lawrence’s desk include stencils, paint rags, glasses, and a notebook.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    A collection of objects from Lawrence’s desk include stencils, paint rags, glasses, and a notebook.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  Pieces from Lawrence’s voluminous archive act like unintentional architectural ornaments, bringing color and humanity to the often Spartan LOT-EK design.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    Pieces from Lawrence’s voluminous archive act like unintentional architectural ornaments, bringing color and humanity to the often Spartan LOT-EK design.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  The couple’s archival photographer Alyssa Gorelick sits in front of Lawrence’s sliding red storage units while Alice reviews some papers in the background.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    The couple’s archival photographer Alyssa Gorelick sits in front of Lawrence’s sliding red storage units while Alice reviews some papers in the background.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  Lawrence relaxes in the master bedroom with a hand-rolled cigarette. The room has a lavender ceiling (Alice was told it’s the best color to see when waking).  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    Lawrence relaxes in the master bedroom with a hand-rolled cigarette. The room has a lavender ceiling (Alice was told it’s the best color to see when waking).

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

  • 
  The Weiners’ first stab at a decorative green roof went awry when workers installed the fabric membrane incorrectly; the plants didn’t thrive, and 
soil leached down the drain, causing a backup in the yard below. But with the help of an artist friend—–and avid gardener—–they successfully brought a piece of cultivated wildness, including hardy flora like creeping thyme, honeysuckle, hops, and kiwi, to their roof.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    The Weiners’ first stab at a decorative green roof went awry when workers installed the fabric membrane incorrectly; the plants didn’t thrive, and soil leached down the drain, causing a backup in the yard below. But with the help of an artist friend—–and avid gardener—–they successfully brought a piece of cultivated wildness, including hardy flora like creeping thyme, honeysuckle, hops, and kiwi, to their roof.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  A garden path in the backyard was paved with discarded marble windowsills and stone doorframes. This reuse of ruins adds texture to the landscape.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    A garden path in the backyard was paved with discarded marble windowsills and stone doorframes. This reuse of ruins adds texture to the landscape.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  The entire house is marked by dramatic changes in color: Though the walls are white, the floors and ceiling swap tones, and pink fluorescent lights give way to a lavender bedroom ceiling. The domestic spectrum culminates in the orange floor and curtains of the rooftop penthouse—–proving that even diamond-plate steel and ventilation ducts, given some Safecoat paint, can be made as colorful and warm as a kindergarten.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    The entire house is marked by dramatic changes in color: Though the walls are white, the floors and ceiling swap tones, and pink fluorescent lights give way to a lavender bedroom ceiling. The domestic spectrum culminates in the orange floor and curtains of the rooftop penthouse—–proving that even diamond-plate steel and ventilation ducts, given some Safecoat paint, can be made as colorful and warm as a kindergarten.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

  • 
  The Weiners put Kalwall translucent panels to good use on the home’s back wall, bringing daylight in without the use of glass windows. Although Kalwall panels can look slightly institutional in cloudy light, the results are often golden, as here.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    The Weiners put Kalwall translucent panels to good use on the home’s back wall, bringing daylight in without the use of glass windows. Although Kalwall panels can look slightly institutional in cloudy light, the results are often golden, as here.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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