written by:
photos by:
February 26, 2009
Originally published in Think Small

"I'm used to spending time on boats," says New York based architect and interior designer Page Goolrick, who has been sailing competitively for 15 years. "It's influenced my design. Sailing vessels are beautifully designed, flexible, made for performance, but also attractive.

White New York apartment with sleeping nook and parquet flooring
Goolrick designed sliding partitions that when closed still allow light to flow through her 560-square-foot space, and when opened reveal cocoonlike sleeping quarters.
Photo by 
1 / 7
Inside designer Page Goolrick's 560-square-foot apartment in New York, storage beneath the bed obviates the need for a dresser and allows for a narrow pass between bed frame and sliding partition. "Every half-inch amounts to something," says Goolrick, "bu
Storage beneath the bed obviates the need for a dresser and allows for a narrow pass between bed frame and sliding partition.
Photo by 
2 / 7
Dark-stained parquet floors offset the muted colors used throughout the space. The glass tiles used to finish the bathroom floor add depth and luminosity.
Photo by 
3 / 7
Goolrick reoriented the kitchen and chose sleek stainless steel countertops and bright white walls and cupboards to create the illusion of space.
Photo by 
4 / 7
One of Goolrick’s custom lights cantilevers over a marble-topped Saarinen Tulip table with the slight camber of a laden fishing pole. The table acts as both dining and work space; the cabinets to the side store all of the requisite office supplies tucked away neatly in custom drawers.
Photo by 
5 / 7
The blinds on Goolrick's Lexington Avenue windows are made from heave white sailcloth, a nod at the sport Goolrick has participated in competitively for over 15 years.
Photo by 
6 / 7
Goolrick’s space multitasks almost as efficiently as she does.
Photo by 
7 / 7
White New York apartment with sleeping nook and parquet flooring
Goolrick designed sliding partitions that when closed still allow light to flow through her 560-square-foot space, and when opened reveal cocoonlike sleeping quarters.
Project 
Goolrick House
Architect 

"I'm used to spending time on boats," says New York based architect and interior designer Page Goolrick, who has been sailing competitively for 15 years. "It's influenced my design. Sailing vessels are beautifully designed, flexible, made for performance, but also attractive. They are not ornamental; they do their job and do it well, but they're beautiful." It seems that the two disciplines have conspired to make Goolrick's design streamlined, efficient, and unobtrusively inventive. And theses qualities are nowhere so apparent as in the Gramercy Park apartment she recently renovated for herself.

Goolrick's 560-square-foot pied-à-terre functions much like the interior of a small yacht: efficient, adaptable, highly functional, and glossily good-looking. With a place for every little thing, and lacking fatuous details, she has created a decadent minimalism on a budget of only $70,000. The apartment is brightly white and richly veined with wood, a dark-stained (formerly cheap blond) parquet floor, walnut shelving, and a walnut sideboard by Knoll. In the bathroom, she used glass tile to generate depth and luminosity. The overall effect has been to create, within a single interior, spaces that are both lofty and intimate.

From the front door, the hallway looks toward a wall of glacier-green, sanded-acrylic sliding doors that form a box around the bedroom. The doors that flank the bed (there's very little room around it-this is a nest if ever there was one) are translucent, but those at its foot are opaque partitions made from lacquered white MDF panels set into Häfele tracks and which, when open, park perfectly against a furred wall of the same width. Goolrick designed custom hardware that allows various panels to telegraph together when open, stacking seamlessly against walls of the same width, and to open sequentially without the messy look of floor channels.

An upholstered headboard is recessed into the wall, leaving a small cavity above to hold books or photographs. Beneath the mattress, a platform contains eight drawers floating slightly off the floor to make room for feet to approach the bed without banging into it. Sleek white cabinetry to the left of the bed hides a flat-screen television that pivots out of its niche, shelving, and a chute-like pocket to hold shoes.

In the hall, the rear of each of two walk-in closets is lined floor-to-ceiling with mirrors, which makes the space, tiered with two racks for clothes, look significantly bigger and deeper than it actually is. (Anything that Goolrick planned to store was measured and the storage containers made to that measure: Trousers on a clip hanger, for instance, took 10 inches of depth instead of the more standard 24 inches.)

Likewise, the kitchen feels economical without being parsimonious: It has simple steel countertops, sheer wall panels, a ribbon of faucet, and two hip-high Sub-Zero refrigerator-freezers that leave room for cabinetry above. Goolrick modified IKEA drawers by cutting openings in them to accommodate plumbing and electrical wiring. "Because the space is so small, I can't just bring anything home. This is kind of like a great hotel suite with a kitchenette, and I like that because it keeps me light and free. Editing is a big part of the [design] process."

In the living room, where books about de Kooning and Matisse and The Poetics of Space are piled on a coffee table, a wide mirror above the sofa bed allows the green canopy of trees in the park seven floors below to be seen from every corner of the apartment. Windows on Lexington Avenue are fitted with blinds made from heavy white sailcloth (and do indeed resemble sails) that pivot about 180 degrees, cantilever parallel with the window to let light in, and park perpendicular with the sill to diffuse light and create privacy. Reaching the corner, where two windows meet at a right angle, they pirouette smoothly to cover the facing window.

The dining room table serves as Goolrick's home office. Behind the table, a diminutive white cabinet contains the equivalent of an office in the equivalent of a sailboat bench: a printer, modem, fax, telephone, and, recessed inside a secret alcove in the shoulder of the cabinet, a stereo. Goolrick designed the cabinet to be exactly 8.5 inches deep to stow a ream of 8.5-by-11-inch paper. "You want to use every inch in this city," Goolrick says. "Every half-inch amounts to something, but it's not necessary to have a lot of square footage to live well."

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...

Latest Articles

Concrete floor, white walls, Bend sectional sofa, Metropolitan chair by B&B Italia, and Arper pouf in living room of Rhode Island family vacation home by Bernheimer Architecture.
Create comfortable areas to lounge, sit, eat, and entertain with these designs.
February 12, 2016
São Paulo apartment dining room with local wood floors and HAY chairs
From concrete to wood, these South American homes enjoy nature inside and out.
February 12, 2016
Custom cabinetry and trim in Chicago apartment renovation.
The Second City is second to none when it comes to inventive modern architecture, from Louis Sullivan to the present day.
February 12, 2016
Kitchen of 1956 midcentury modern Palm Springs home.
Celebrate Palm Springs Modernism Week, which runs from February 11–21, with a look at some of our favorite modern desert oases.
February 12, 2016
Gustav bicycle by Coh&Co
Designmuseum Danmark unveils a permanent collection highlighting new developments in Danish design.
February 12, 2016
A Seattle studio's courtyard
Every week, we highlight one amazing Dwell home that went viral on Pinterest. Follow Dwell's Pinterest account for more daily design inspiration.
February 12, 2016
Chalet in the French alps
An innovative glass addition adds contrast to a timber mountain lodge in France.
February 11, 2016
Aumas' assorted collectables.
Bright colors and vintage furniture are abound in these French homes.
February 11, 2016
Kogan designed a number of the built-in furnishings, including the headboard and cupboard in the master bedroom.The cupboard is deliberately reminiscent of a mid-century stereo speaker. The vintage lounge chairs are by Percival Lafer.
Need to relax? Make your bedroom an oasis from the rest of the house.
February 11, 2016
Modern Florida seaside home with corian island, dornbracht faucet, cees braakman combex chairs and marble knoll table in the kitchen
Read more about Knoll's impressive career here, but in the meantime, explore just a few of her works in these contemporary homes.
February 11, 2016
Modern small box home in Mexico
Letting the warm climate indoors is a common thread through these diverse dwellings.
February 11, 2016
Modern white cabinets under the stairs with skylight above
What could be better than a modest-sized house in a quaintly historic city?
February 11, 2016
dining room lighting
These renovations connect rustic, classic, and modern design in Italy.
February 10, 2016
12362509 211441865858796 1743381178 n1
Each week, we tap into Dwell's Instagram community to bring you the most viral design and architecture shots of the week.
February 10, 2016
modern outdoor garden room plastic polycarbonate
From colorful living rooms to a backyard retreat, Belgian designers reimagine vernacular forms and materials for the modern world.
February 10, 2016
Tel Aviv kitchen with custom dining table and Smeg fridge
Would you go for an out-of-the-box palette for your major appliances? See how these kitchens tackle the trend.
February 10, 2016
Exhibition view, of Klaus Wittkugel works at P! gallery, New York
On view through February 21 at New York's P! gallery, a new show explores the politics of Cold War-era graphic design with a presentation of works by Klaus Wittkugel—East Germany's most prolific graphic designer. Curator Prem Krishnamurthy walks us through the highlights.
February 10, 2016
Reclaimed cedar and gray-stucco home outside San Francisco.
The new kid on the block in a predominantly Eichler neighborhood, this Menlo Park home breaks the mold and divides into three pavilions connected by breezeways.
February 10, 2016
A third floor addition and whole-house renovation modernized a funky cottage on an unusual, triple-wide lot in San Francisco.
From modern interiors hidden within historic structures to unabashedly modern dwellings, these seven renovations take totally different approaches to San Francisco's historic building stock.
February 10, 2016
Delphi sofa from Erik Jørgensen and gyrofocus fireplace in living room of Villa Le Trident in the French Riviera, renovated by 4a Architekten.
The Aegean's all-white architecture famously helped inspire Le Corbusier; these five dwellings continue in that proud modern tradition (though not all are as minimalist).
February 10, 2016
San Francisco dining room with chandelier and Eames shell chairs
Brooklyn-based RBW's work—from diminutive sconces to large floor lamps—shape these five interiors.
February 09, 2016
Glass-fronted converted garage in Washington
These garages go behind parking cars and storing your drum sets.
February 09, 2016
Modern Texas home office with sliding walls, behr black chalkboard paint, concrete walls, and white oak flooring
From appropriated nooks to glass-encased rooms, each of these modern offices works a unique angle.
February 09, 2016
picnic-style table in renovated San Francisco house
From chandeliers to pendants, these designs make the dining room the most entertaining space in the house.
February 09, 2016
Midcentury house in Portland with iron colored facade and gold front door
From preserved masterworks to carefully updated time capsules, these homes have one thing in common (other than a healthy appreciation for everything Eames): the conviction that the '40s, '50s, and '60s were the most outstanding moments in American architecture.
February 09, 2016
Modern living room with furniture designed by Ludovica + Roberto Palomba
These oases by the sea, many done up in white, make stunning escapes.
February 08, 2016
A Philippe Starck standing lamp and an Eames chaise longue bracket the living room; two Lawrence Weiner prints hang behind a pair of Warren Platner chairs and a table purchased from a River Oaks estate sale; at far left of the room, a partial wall of new
Texas might have a big reputation, but these homes show the variety of shapes and sizes in the Lone Star State.
February 08, 2016
Montigo gas-burning fireplace in spacious living room.
Built atop the foundation of a flood-damaged home, this 3,000-square-foot Maryland home features vibrant furniture placed in front of stunning views of a nearby estuary.
February 08, 2016
Studio addition in Seattle
An architect couple sets out to transform a run-down property.
February 08, 2016
West Elm coffee table, custom Joybird sofa, and matching Jens Risom chairs in living room of Westchester renovation by Khanna Shultz.
Every Monday, @dwell and @designmilk invite fans and experts on Twitter to weigh in on trending topics in design.
February 08, 2016