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Twice as Nice

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Within the mix of warehouses, detached brick bungalows, and dusty pubs of the Sydney, Australia, suburb of Alexandria, local architect David Langston-Jones has built an intricate and finely textured duplex that’s one part speculative development, one part home for the owner and architect. The building’s two small units (Langston-Jones occupies one and rents the other) benefit from a shared shady patio that makes the somewhat cramped quarters a leafy retreat.
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  The double-height ceiling and ample northern light in the dining room make it rather cozy within.  Photo by: Nick Bowers
    The double-height ceiling and ample northern light in the dining room make it rather cozy within.

    Photo by: Nick Bowers

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  Corrugated steel cladding defines the exterior.  Photo by: Nick Bowers
    Corrugated steel cladding defines the exterior.

    Photo by: Nick Bowers

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  Langston-Jones doubled the outdoor space by combining the back patio of his unit and that of his neighbor. A small screen of gracilis, or weaver’s bamboo, and Rhapis palms provides privacy between the courtyards while still remaining relatively transparent. “When funds allow, a stainless steel chain-mail ‘curtain’ will be suspended from the roof structure to provide further privacy,” the architect notes.  Photo by: Nick Bowers
    Langston-Jones doubled the outdoor space by combining the back patio of his unit and that of his neighbor. A small screen of gracilis, or weaver’s bamboo, and Rhapis palms provides privacy between the courtyards while still remaining relatively transparent. “When funds allow, a stainless steel chain-mail ‘curtain’ will be suspended from the roof structure to provide further privacy,” the architect notes.

    Photo by: Nick Bowers

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  The kitchen, clad in the same wood as the joinery walls, is designed like a self-contained piece of furniture.  Photo by: Nick Bowers
    The kitchen, clad in the same wood as the joinery walls, is designed like a self-contained piece of furniture.

    Photo by: Nick Bowers

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  Langston-Jones works tucked in his office beneath the stairs.  Photo by: Nick BowersCourtesy of: Nick Bowers
    Langston-Jones works tucked in his office beneath the stairs.

    Photo by: Nick Bowers

    Courtesy of: Nick Bowers

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  David Underwood, Langston-Jones’s partner, opens the large glass doors that expand the interior of the small house out onto the sun-drenched courtyard garden. In keeping with Langston-Jones’s love of Le Corbusier, the dining room chairs are LC7s and the table is an LC6 by the famed Swiss architect and Charlotte Perriand.  Photo by: Nick BowersCourtesy of: Nick Bowers
    David Underwood, Langston-Jones’s partner, opens the large glass doors that expand the interior of the small house out onto the sun-drenched courtyard garden. In keeping with Langston-Jones’s love of Le Corbusier, the dining room chairs are LC7s and the table is an LC6 by the famed Swiss architect and Charlotte Perriand.

    Photo by: Nick Bowers

    Courtesy of: Nick Bowers

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  Langston-Jones created a custom armrest that he had made to fit snugly on his blue Slaapbank sofa designed by Martin Vissin.  Photo by: Nick Bowers
    Langston-Jones created a custom armrest that he had made to fit snugly on his blue Slaapbank sofa designed by Martin Vissin.

    Photo by: Nick Bowers

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  American walnut veneer covers the cabinets in the kitchen.  Photo by: Nick Bowers
    American walnut veneer covers the cabinets in the kitchen.

    Photo by: Nick Bowers

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  Tight quarters in the bathroom allow for a bit more room in the main living spaces.  Photo by: Nick Bowers
    Tight quarters in the bathroom allow for a bit more room in the main living spaces.

    Photo by: Nick Bowers

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