Stow Aways

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photos by:
February 17, 2011

How do you squeeze maximum functionality out of minimal space? Rosa and Robert Garneau make it happen with multipurpose furniture, a hydraulic Murphy bed, and secret compartments galore.

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  Screened by the sliding door, Rosa cozies up with a book in the bedroom, while across the apartment Robert uses the hydraulic kitchen table as a work desk. “We wanted to explore the power of custom design by creating integrated furniture to maximize both efficiency and aesthetics,” says Rosa.  Photo by: Ian Allen
    Screened by the sliding door, Rosa cozies up with a book in the bedroom, while across the apartment Robert uses the hydraulic kitchen table as a work desk. “We wanted to explore the power of custom design by creating integrated furniture to maximize both efficiency and aesthetics,” says Rosa.

    Photo by: Ian Allen

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  In a space measuring just 650 square feet, multifunctionality is key.  Photo by: Ian Allen
    In a space measuring just 650 square feet, multifunctionality is key.

    Photo by: Ian Allen

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  The walnut dining room table does quadruple duty as a work station and storage unit, and an eating and entertaining area.  Photo by: Ian Allen
    The walnut dining room table does quadruple duty as a work station and storage unit, and an eating and entertaining area.

    Photo by: Ian Allen

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  The table's hydraulic controls and hidden drawers.  Photo by: Ian Allen
    The table's hydraulic controls and hidden drawers.

    Photo by: Ian Allen

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  Once you fold up the Murphy bed in the bedroom, there’s plenty of space for a stretch—even for Robert, who’s six-foot-four.  Photo by: Ian Allen
    Once you fold up the Murphy bed in the bedroom, there’s plenty of space for a stretch—even for Robert, who’s six-foot-four.

    Photo by: Ian Allen

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  “We wanted to keep the exterior walls uncluttered, so you can focus on the views, the light, and the air,” says Rosa. To achieve a clean slate, everything gets tucked away, including the mattress and bedding.  Photo by: Ian Allen
    “We wanted to keep the exterior walls uncluttered, so you can focus on the views, the light, and the air,” says Rosa. To achieve a clean slate, everything gets tucked away, including the mattress and bedding.

    Photo by: Ian Allen

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  Kitchen and art supplies get tucked away as well.  Photo by: Ian Allen
    Kitchen and art supplies get tucked away as well.

    Photo by: Ian Allen

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  Robert's sketches and artwork in drawers built into the sofa.  Photo by: Ian Allen
    Robert's sketches and artwork in drawers built into the sofa.

    Photo by: Ian Allen

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  Even the laundry hampers, above, are discreetly stowed out of sight.  Photo by: Ian Allen
    Even the laundry hampers, above, are discreetly stowed out of sight.

    Photo by: Ian Allen

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  With space for shoes (the pair don’t wear any in the home), Rollerblading gear, umbrellas, and more, the deep entrance closet helps the couple maintain their minimalist interior. A hanging rod, made by Specialty Lighting, has an integrated light that turns on when the 200-pound door is opened. specialtylighting.com  Photo by: Ian Allen
    With space for shoes (the pair don’t wear any in the home), Rollerblading gear, umbrellas, and more, the deep entrance closet helps the couple maintain their minimalist interior. A hanging rod, made by Specialty Lighting, has an integrated light that turns on when the 200-pound door is opened. specialtylighting.com

    Photo by: Ian Allen

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  For easy solutions to complicated hardware problems, the team’s favorite first stop is the Häfele showroom in the Flatiron District. They sourced the rotating rods for the closet there, as well as the Murphy bed components. “But we just like going back and looking for inspiration,” says Rosa. hafele.com  Photo by: Ian Allen
    For easy solutions to complicated hardware problems, the team’s favorite first stop is the Häfele showroom in the Flatiron District. They sourced the rotating rods for the closet there, as well as the Murphy bed components. “But we just like going back and looking for inspiration,” says Rosa. hafele.com

    Photo by: Ian Allen

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  To make the modest space flexible, Robert built a sliding wall with QuietRock soundproofing drywall on the living-room side and rich PureBond walnut-veneer plywood on the bedroom side. When the wall is closed, the bedroom becomes private, and art books and collectibles are revealed on built-in shelves in the living room. quietrock.com  Photo by: Ian Allen
    To make the modest space flexible, Robert built a sliding wall with QuietRock soundproofing drywall on the living-room side and rich PureBond walnut-veneer plywood on the bedroom side. When the wall is closed, the bedroom becomes private, and art books and collectibles are revealed on built-in shelves in the living room. quietrock.com

    Photo by: Ian Allen

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  The couple really liked Prologue can lights by Kreon but couldn't afford them. So they bought aluminum sheets, sanded them, and folded them around standard track fixtures for a similar look. The total cost, including the transformer: about $40 per fixture.  Photo by: Ian Allen
    The couple really liked Prologue can lights by Kreon but couldn't afford them. So they bought aluminum sheets, sanded them, and folded them around standard track fixtures for a similar look. The total cost, including the transformer: about $40 per fixture.

    Photo by: Ian Allen

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  An adjustable dining-room table is relatively common in Europe, according to the couple, who ordered their hydraulic legs from Switzerland. They allow for up to four presets, so the Garneaus have one for dining, one for working, and two for cooking, depending on who’s the chef. The table itself was designed by Robert’s firm, Studio Garneau, and has five drawers in it, some big enough to store Robert’s oversize flat artwork. skf.comDon't miss a word of Dwell! Download our  FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!  Photo by: Ian Allen
    An adjustable dining-room table is relatively common in Europe, according to the couple, who ordered their hydraulic legs from Switzerland. They allow for up to four presets, so the Garneaus have one for dining, one for working, and two for cooking, depending on who’s the chef. The table itself was designed by Robert’s firm, Studio Garneau, and has five drawers in it, some big enough to store Robert’s oversize flat artwork. skf.comDon't miss a word of Dwell! Download our FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!

    Photo by: Ian Allen

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