Small Amidst Sprawl

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January 18, 2009
Rising out of the Texas bayou, Houston is both a sprawling metropolis and the largest city in the United States without zoning regulations. This cause-and-effect relationship has, over time, resulted in a hodgepodge of land use and a multitude of architectural styles that give the city its most unique alias, a city without memory. Read Full Article
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  Schatz and Eamon carefully tend to the greens planted on the ground that they took to with shovels when digging the original footings for their home.  Photo by: Misty Keasler
    Schatz and Eamon carefully tend to the greens planted on the ground that they took to with shovels when digging the original footings for their home.

    Photo by: Misty Keasler

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  A ladder leads up to the bedroom, which is tucked under the curve of the vaulted roof. The Sunburst clock is by George Nelson; the flat-screen TV is by Philips.  Photo by: Misty Keasler
    A ladder leads up to the bedroom, which is tucked under the curve of the vaulted roof. The Sunburst clock is by George Nelson; the flat-screen TV is by Philips.

    Photo by: Misty Keasler

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  The architects designed the bed and nightstands themselves and picked up the lamps from Target. "We've found that you can mix design and commodity stuff well if you're attentive to the overall presentation," says Schatz.  Photo by: Misty Keasler
    The architects designed the bed and nightstands themselves and picked up the lamps from Target. "We've found that you can mix design and commodity stuff well if you're attentive to the overall presentation," says Schatz.

    Photo by: Misty Keasler

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  These 3107 chairs and Superellipse table are from Fritz Hansen.  Photo by: Misty Keasler
    These 3107 chairs and Superellipse table are from Fritz Hansen.

    Photo by: Misty Keasler

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  Schatz and Eamon bought a small sheet of copper, cut out their house numbers, mixed and poured some concrete, and voilá-- their own groovy house numbers for $125.  Photo by: Misty Keasler
    Schatz and Eamon bought a small sheet of copper, cut out their house numbers, mixed and poured some concrete, and voilá-- their own groovy house numbers for $125.

    Photo by: Misty Keasler

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