written by:
photos by:
February 5, 2012
Originally published in Less Is Modern

New Zealand architect Davor Popadich invoked nautical sheds in his unconventional design for his family’s home on Auckland’s North Shore.

Affordable house renovation in new zealand

The exterior of the Popadich residence is modeled after boat storage sheds, while the interior is outfitted with industrial concrete and ply.

Photo by 
Courtesy of 
© 2011 Simon Devitt
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Maximizing small spaces for extra storage

Davor (with his wife, Abbe, and son, August) designed the main living and dining pavilion as a double-height space to increase its perceived volume, and added high cubbies for extra storage.

Photo by 
Courtesy of 
© 2011 Simon Devitt
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Aluminum-clad home with pitched roof in New Zealand

With its pitched roof and verticality, the house blends with the surrounding seaside neighborhood yet remains architecturally distinct thanks to its aluminum cladding.

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© 2011 Simon Devitt
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Black bifold Vistalite doors

Davor and August check out the yard from the living room. “The bifold Vistalite doors allow us to open the house up completely and enjoy the fresh, warm air,” Davor says.

Photo by 
Courtesy of 
© 2011 Simon Devitt
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Modern living room interior design
Warm Front

Auckland’s climate is relatively mild, but Davor and Abbe decided not to scrimp on insulation, installing fiberglass batts with R-values above building code requirements in the ceiling and the walls. This, combined with the home’s concrete floor (with standard polystyrene insulation) that retains solar heat, means Davor and Abbe only use their New Zealand–made wood-burning Warmington Studio fireplace in the coldest months.warmington.co.nz

All of the Lights

Davor and Abbe created their striking living-room lights—colored cords with exposed bulbs—by calling on a number of different suppliers to put together a look that suits their home’s pared-down aesthetic. The cord for their electrical cables is from Frinab in Sweden, and they teamed the lights with stainless-steel switch plates by Forbes & Lomax sourced through Abbe’s site, Piper Traders.frinab.seforbesandlomax.compipertraders.co.nz

Photo by 
Courtesy of 
© 2011 Simon Devitt
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Chair One dining chairs by Konstantin Grcic for Magis
Chair Necessities

The couple’s four Chair One dining chairs by Konstantin Grcic for Magis are among their most prized possessions. They had been given their dining table as a wedding gift but couldn’t afford enough chairs to surround it, so they opted for a wooden bench on one side and the Grcic chairs on the other. Davor says he’s pleased they purchased the chairs early in the design process before the budget got really tight.magisdesign.com

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Courtesy of 
© 2011 Simon Devitt
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Concrete kitchen countertop and wood walls
Island Life

The appealing, handcrafted appearance of the concrete kitchen island is a happy accident, the result of the concrete not settling fully in its timber framing. When the framing was removed, the builder, Peter Davidson, was worried that Davor and Abbe would be disappointed with the bubbled result and offered to start the process again, but they loved its one-off feeling and persuaded him to keep it that way.

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Courtesy of 
© 2011 Simon Devitt
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Minimalist mezzanine bedroom with French oak floorboards
Floor Bored

Abbe and Davor worried that plywood floors in the mezzanine bedroom would feel monotonous, given that the walls and ceilings were ply too. So they sourced second-grade French oak floorboards and filled in the holes in the timber’s knots themselves. Then they used leftover boards to make a door to cover a small opening between their room and August’s and for the sliding pantry door in the kitchen.qualitywoodfloors.co.nz 

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Photo by 
Courtesy of 
© 2011 Simon Devitt
8 / 8
Affordable house renovation in new zealand

The exterior of the Popadich residence is modeled after boat storage sheds, while the interior is outfitted with industrial concrete and ply.

Image courtesy of © 2011 Simon Devitt.
Project 
Popadich Residence
Architect 

Davor Popadich, a director at Pattersons Architects in Auckland, New Zealand, never dreamed that he and his wife, Abbe, who runs a small home-furnishings importing company, could gather enough funds to design a home of their own. They figured their chances of finding a vacant site within reasonable distance of their workplaces downtown and having enough money left over to build a house on it were almost zero. “There’s no way we ever thought we would be building,” says Abbe. “It was just too expensive.”

Maximizing small spaces for extra storage

Davor (with his wife, Abbe, and son, August) designed the main living and dining pavilion as a double-height space to increase its perceived volume, and added high cubbies for extra storage.

Image courtesy of © 2011 Simon Devitt.
In 2008, the couple decided to move out of their central-city studio apartment and look for an existing home they could purchase and renovate. After two unsuccessful bids on small properties on Auckland’s North Shore, about five miles from downtown, they made an impulsive offer on a small site in the coastal area that had been subdivided from a larger property. When that was accepted, they faced a hard fact: They had just $187,000 left with which to build their new house. “I remember saying, ‘We could live in a half-finished house,’ ” notes Abbe. Adds Davor, “We’re quite stupid like that.” In the end, Popadich’s inexpensively exe-cuted building concept, based on a simple, pitched-roof boat-shed form, proved to be very smart.

Abbe: We really only looked at this site because we were intrigued by it, as sites hardly ever become available in this area. We thought we’d make an offer because we were almost certain it would be turned down. Then our offer was accepted and we thought, “Goodness—we’re going to need to put a house on that.” So we had to go for it and start the process of building.

Black bifold Vistalite doors

Davor and August check out the yard from the living room. “The bifold Vistalite doors allow us to open the house up completely and enjoy the fresh, warm air,” Davor says.

Image courtesy of © 2011 Simon Devitt.
Davor: The site is small but flat, so I was able to see some possibilities for it. I worked on the design in my spare time for about a year. I loved doing it—I was really on a high throughout the process. Early on we decided we liked the idea of a house inspired by boat sheds, because we thought it would be economical to build and would look appropriate for this seaside suburb. I designed two slightly offset double-height modules with the same dimensions, with a steel portal frame supporting them. One has a mezzanine bedroom with the kitchen and dining area below while the other has the entry, bathrooms upstairs and downstairs, and a double-height living space. Then the building estimate came in at $285,000 and I came down off my high pretty quickly. I had to modify the plans so we could get closer to our budget. The bank was only going to loan us $187,000—there wasn’t any room for cost overruns.

A couple of key changes meant big savings. Initially, I had specified commercial-grade aluminum windows and doors, but then I realized that settling for a cheaper range would save us another $22,000, and it didn’t look too different. I also went to meet the window fabricator and worked with him on devising a window structure that would be simple to make and that would use materials efficiently and cheaply. We had planned on installing an under-floor heating system in the concrete floor slab, but we took it out in the hope that there would be enough solar gain during the day and insulation in the walls and ceilings to keep the heat in. We were right, and we saved about $6,000 by doing that.

There were other ways we saved money. We got more competitive quotes from plumbers and electricians, and saved about $8,000 by shopping around. In the design, I had originally specified the ridge beams as steel, but it turned out to be cheaper to do them in timber. I didn’t mind as long as we kept to a simple materials palette: timber, ply, and a bit of steel. We chose corrugated, prepainted aluminum sheets for the external cladding because they were relatively cheap and robust. Everything was measured and sized exactly so we didn’t order any more materials than we needed. I detailed the house so its construction would involve as few tradespeople as possible. For example, the internal doors, the built-in seats, and the bathroom and kitchen cupboards were all made onsite by the builder—and the built-in seats saved us money on furniture. And we decided to line the interior in exposed plywood sheets—on paper, plasterboard seemed cheaper, but then we realized it would cost money to plaster and paint it, which pushed the overall cost up. And the builders liked that, because they got to show off their workmanship, which is usually covered up by plaster and paint.

Modern living room interior design
Warm Front

Auckland’s climate is relatively mild, but Davor and Abbe decided not to scrimp on insulation, installing fiberglass batts with R-values above building code requirements in the ceiling and the walls. This, combined with the home’s concrete floor (with standard polystyrene insulation) that retains solar heat, means Davor and Abbe only use their New Zealand–made wood-burning Warmington Studio fireplace in the coldest months.warmington.co.nz

All of the Lights

Davor and Abbe created their striking living-room lights—colored cords with exposed bulbs—by calling on a number of different suppliers to put together a look that suits their home’s pared-down aesthetic. The cord for their electrical cables is from Frinab in Sweden, and they teamed the lights with stainless-steel switch plates by Forbes & Lomax sourced through Abbe’s site, Piper Traders.frinab.seforbesandlomax.compipertraders.co.nz

Image courtesy of © 2011 Simon Devitt.
I designed the house as a two-stage build—the scheme has a lean-to structure containing a garage and two bedrooms on the southern end of the house, but we decided to build it at a later date to make the house affordable to begin with. The house is 1,184 square feet now, and the addition, when we eventually do it, will add another 348 square feet of living space, plus the garage. Partway into the design process, we found out Abbe was pregnant [the couple’s son, August, is now two years old]. We couldn’t afford to make the house any bigger at that stage, so I designed a spare bedroom in what was originally planned as our walk-in wardrobe so the baby could sleep there. We’ve been in the house over a year, and now we have a new baby, Violeta, so it looks like we might have to try and build the addition sooner rather than later.

Abbe: Davor was really careful about the form of the house, and I was focused on how we were going to live: where we were going to sit at night and how we were going to relax. I wanted window seats—I imagined our perfect life as starting the day with coffee on a window seat in the sunshine. The whole process forced us to think about how we wanted to live, which was great. Normally, you move into a house that someone else has designed and just live with it, and not ask yourself these questions.

Davor: Abbe wanted the house to feel intimate. The warmth of the interior was more critical than the appearance to her. When it came to the design, I really did pretty much the same thing as we would do at work: I treated Abbe as my client, and asked her what the brief was.

We talked a lot during the process about everything to do with the house. It became really enjoyable—in some ways I found having less money gives you more freedom. If we had lots of money I would probably still be trying to decide what to do. If you could have every choice, what choice would you make? This became more about necessity and what was essential. But now that the house is finished, it feels like we have everything we wanted. The beautiful thing about building your own house is that if you get it right it will allow you to live the way you want to.

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