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Pittsburgh Steeler

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With a nod to the Burgh’s industrial heritage, and an eye toward the new, Jeff Walz replaced an aging farmhouse with a chic steel cube.
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  Jeff Walz gazes over the railing from the front stoop of his recycled steel–and–glass home, which replaced the quaint-but-decrepit 140-year-old farm-house in which he’d originally planned to reside  Photo by: Livia CoronaCourtesy of: Livia Corona
    Jeff Walz gazes over the railing from the front stoop of his recycled steel–and–glass home, which replaced the quaint-but-decrepit 140-year-old farm-house in which he’d originally planned to reside

    Photo by: Livia Corona

    Courtesy of: Livia Corona

  • 
  Still life with IKEA lampshade and ventless fireplace. The unfinished, black, welded- steel railing borders steps made of framing lumber, which emit a friendly, old-fashioned creak as Walz treads up and down.  Photo by: Livia CoronaCourtesy of: Livia Corona
    Still life with IKEA lampshade and ventless fireplace. The unfinished, black, welded- steel railing borders steps made of framing lumber, which emit a friendly, old-fashioned creak as Walz treads up and down.

    Photo by: Livia Corona

    Courtesy of: Livia Corona

  • 
  The open office and bedroom reside on either side of the second story catwalk. Below, Walz rests on a George Nakashima–inspired bench designed by architect Harry Levine’s Uncle Murray, while industrial designer Scott Summitt sits in a vintage Eames rocker.  Photo by: Livia CoronaCourtesy of: Livia Corona
    The open office and bedroom reside on either side of the second story catwalk. Below, Walz rests on a George Nakashima–inspired bench designed by architect Harry Levine’s Uncle Murray, while industrial designer Scott Summitt sits in a vintage Eames rocker.

    Photo by: Livia Corona

    Courtesy of: Livia Corona

  • 
    Photo by: Livia Corona

    Photo by: Livia Corona

  • 
  Summit created a functional kitchen island out of Walz’s childhood workbench, fitting 
it with various IKEA parts. The vice makes an ideal wine grabber, and pieces of black iron pipe hold candles. “Now it’s very Martha Stewart,” jokes Summit.  Photo by: Livia Corona
    Summit created a functional kitchen island out of Walz’s childhood workbench, fitting it with various IKEA parts. The vice makes an ideal wine grabber, and pieces of black iron pipe hold candles. “Now it’s very Martha Stewart,” jokes Summit.

    Photo by: Livia Corona

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