Advertising
Advertising

You are here

Modern Surf Shack in Venice

Read Article

It was the surf and the artsy vibe that attracted Eric Grunbaum to Venice Beach, California, 18 years ago. An avid surfer and creative director for an advertising agency, he thrives on lively environs. So it’s no surprise that he turned to the Los Angeles–based architect Barbara Bestor to design a house for him near the Pacific. Bestor, the chair of graduate studies at Woodbury University School of Architecture, has a formidable reputation in Southern California for her bohemian modernism, and for Grunbaum, she created a 2,000–square-foot, three-bedroom, three-bath home that harbors a traditional sensibility with a contemporary heart. Grunbaum gives us the tour of his modern surf shack.

  • 
  From the deck off the master bedroom, Eric Grunbaum looks across his front yard. Barbara Bestor designed the second story to float over the ground “like a cloud.”  Photo by: Ye Rin MokCourtesy of: Ye Rin Mok
    From the deck off the master bedroom, Eric Grunbaum looks across his front yard. Barbara Bestor designed the second story to float over the ground “like a cloud.”

    Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

    Courtesy of: Ye Rin Mok

  • 
  Grunbaum was unafraid of a little color, as his living room proves. It includes a coffee table by Mockett and a Tufty-Time sofa by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia.  Photo by: Ye Rin Mok
    Grunbaum was unafraid of a little color, as his living room proves. It includes a coffee table by Mockett and a Tufty-Time sofa by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia.

    Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

  • 
  A music and cycling fan (the vintage bike is by Vivalo), Grunbaum mans the turntables while friends gather in the kitchen. Case Study barstools are from Modernica.  Photo by: Ye Rin Mok
    A music and cycling fan (the vintage bike is by Vivalo), Grunbaum mans the turntables while friends gather in the kitchen. Case Study barstools are from Modernica.

    Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

  • 
  The dining room is meant to be a flexible space for eating or dancing. “One of the most important things for me,” explains Grunbaum, “is how a house feels. It has to be a place where you don’t want to leave.” The Cyclone table is by Isamu Noguchi for Knoll and the pendant lamp is by Lightoiler.  Photo by: Ye Rin Mok
    The dining room is meant to be a flexible space for eating or dancing. “One of the most important things for me,” explains Grunbaum, “is how a house feels. It has to be a place where you don’t want to leave.” The Cyclone table is by Isamu Noguchi for Knoll and the pendant lamp is by Lightoiler.

    Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

  • 
  Bestor restricted the height of the walls on the second floor to allow the clerestory windows to carry light from the front deck all the way to the guest bedroom in back.  Photo by: Ye Rin Mok
    Bestor restricted the height of the walls on the second floor to allow the clerestory windows to carry light from the front deck all the way to the guest bedroom in back.

    Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

  • 
  The “murdered kitchen” includes a fluorescent light sculpture with dimmable ballasts designed by Bestor. The rough plywood offers a nice chromatic contrast.  Photo by: Ye Rin Mok
    The “murdered kitchen” includes a fluorescent light sculpture with dimmable ballasts designed by Bestor. The rough plywood offers a nice chromatic contrast.

    Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

  • 
  Bestor gave each area of the house its own color scheme. The bright yellow stairwell maintains a cheery mood throughout.  Photo by: Ye Rin Mok
    Bestor gave each area of the house its own color scheme. The bright yellow stairwell maintains a cheery mood throughout.

    Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

  • 
  Magenta is one of Grunbaum’s favorite colors, so he picked out a magenta Tufty-Time couch by B&B Italia and added a hot pink powder-coated faucet by Vola for the downstairs bath.  Photo by: Ye Rin Mok
    Magenta is one of Grunbaum’s favorite colors, so he picked out a magenta Tufty-Time couch by B&B Italia and added a hot pink powder-coated faucet by Vola for the downstairs bath.

    Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

  • 
  The home already has a vivid color scheme, but to energize certain areas further, Bestor and Grunbaum added murals to some of the walls. Aside from the vinyl decals in the bathrooms, the stairwell is painted to evoke Grunbaum’s family home in the 1970s. Designer Mina Javid created a faux headboard for the master bedroom. minajavid.com  Photo by: Ye Rin Mok
    The home already has a vivid color scheme, but to energize certain areas further, Bestor and Grunbaum added murals to some of the walls. Aside from the vinyl decals in the bathrooms, the stairwell is painted to evoke Grunbaum’s family home in the 1970s. Designer Mina Javid created a faux headboard for the master bedroom. minajavid.com

    Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

  • 
  Los Angeles–based graphic designer Chris Loomis created a trio of window
decals for the house’s three bathrooms. Grunbaum went with a camouflage pattern for privacy in the master bathroom, which has a wall of floor-to-ceiling glass that looks onto an adjacent patio. “Because we’re sort of in the trees, I wanted to keep the plant theme going,” he says. laloomis.com  Photo by: Ye Rin Mok
    Los Angeles–based graphic designer Chris Loomis created a trio of window decals for the house’s three bathrooms. Grunbaum went with a camouflage pattern for privacy in the master bathroom, which has a wall of floor-to-ceiling glass that looks onto an adjacent patio. “Because we’re sort of in the trees, I wanted to keep the plant theme going,” he says. laloomis.com

    Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

  • 
  California isn't known for its front porch culture, but Grunbaum loves Venice's walk streets and their pedestrian vibe, so he employed landscape designer Stephanie Bartron to orient his small patio towards the street. The house itself acts as a windbreak, and lush patio furniture and a small fire pit turn what could have been another exercise in backyard solipsism into the home's most neighborly spot.  Photo by: Ye Rin Mok
    California isn't known for its front porch culture, but Grunbaum loves Venice's walk streets and their pedestrian vibe, so he employed landscape designer Stephanie Bartron to orient his small patio towards the street. The house itself acts as a windbreak, and lush patio furniture and a small fire pit turn what could have been another exercise in backyard solipsism into the home's most neighborly spot.

    Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

@current / @total

More

Add comment

Log in or register to post comments
Advertising