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Four Walls and a Screw-Top

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What does a $9.99 bottle of screw-top wine have to do with a prefab house? Vetter Denk made the connections in an innovative getaway for an enterprising vintner.

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  On the shores of Moose Lake, Wisconsin, the inspiration for Roger Scommegna’s Aperture House came from the $9.99 bottles of wine produced at his Signal Ridge Vineyard.  Photo by: J.J. Sulin
    On the shores of Moose Lake, Wisconsin, the inspiration for Roger Scommegna’s Aperture House came from the $9.99 bottles of wine produced at his Signal Ridge Vineyard.

    Photo by: J.J. Sulin

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  A comfy set of nine interlocking orange throw pillows from Roche Bobois fills the downstairs television room.  Photo by: J.J. Sulin
    A comfy set of nine interlocking orange throw pillows from Roche Bobois fills the downstairs television room.

    Photo by: J.J. Sulin

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  Each of the house’s three sliding patio doors was positioned to frame panoramic views of Moose Lake, so it was important that the furniture wouldn’t get in the way. The pieces chosen were just right: A low-lying couch and armchair, both by Luminaire, hug the living room floor. A square coffee table, also by Luminaire, sits less than a foot off a blue shag rug.  Photo by: J.J. Sulin
    Each of the house’s three sliding patio doors was positioned to frame panoramic views of Moose Lake, so it was important that the furniture wouldn’t get in the way. The pieces chosen were just right: A low-lying couch and armchair, both by Luminaire, hug the living room floor. A square coffee table, also by Luminaire, sits less than a foot off a blue shag rug.

    Photo by: J.J. Sulin

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  Backless picnic-style benches stand in for chairs at the refinished Milwau­kee Public Library table where the family eats their meals. The sofa and armchair are from Luminaire.  Photo by: J.J. Sulin
    Backless picnic-style benches stand in for chairs at the refinished Milwau­kee Public Library table where the family eats their meals. The sofa and armchair are from Luminaire.

    Photo by: J.J. Sulin

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  The kitchen cabinets where the Scommegnas store their dishes are open, creating what Vetter calls a “nonfussy, more direct approach to the storage of your daily items.” Scommegna allows that a pair of doors easily could have been added without much trouble. “But then you’ve got to open it every time you need something,” he says. “It’s just dumb. What are you hiding? They’re just plates.”  Photo by: J.J. Sulin
    The kitchen cabinets where the Scommegnas store their dishes are open, creating what Vetter calls a “nonfussy, more direct approach to the storage of your daily items.” Scommegna allows that a pair of doors easily could have been added without much trouble. “But then you’ve got to open it every time you need something,” he says. “It’s just dumb. What are you hiding? They’re just plates.”

    Photo by: J.J. Sulin

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  The Aperture House, facing Moose Lake.  Photo by: J.J. Sulin
    The Aperture House, facing Moose Lake.

    Photo by: J.J. Sulin

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  The house’s interior walls are medium-density fiberboard, the sort of material that more typically is covered with drywall. Instead, the fiberboard was coated with a linseed oil to accent its natural, rich tan and finished with a catalyzed var-nish to make it water-resistant. The effect is an interior wall surface that complements the earth tones that dominate the house’s decor and never needs to be painted.  Photo by: J.J. Sulin
    The house’s interior walls are medium-density fiberboard, the sort of material that more typically is covered with drywall. Instead, the fiberboard was coated with a linseed oil to accent its natural, rich tan and finished with a catalyzed var-nish to make it water-resistant. The effect is an interior wall surface that complements the earth tones that dominate the house’s decor and never needs to be painted.

    Photo by: J.J. Sulin

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  To help keep the house free of clutter, the full-size refrigerator was hidden in a basement utility room. An unobtrusive three-foot-tall fridge and matching freezer—made by Sub-Zero—were tucked beneath a kitchen countertop. “There are so many more options with refrigeration, and under-the-counter is really great,” says Vetter. “You free up space and don’t have this big, clunky thing sitting there.” www.subzero.com  Photo by: J.J. Sulin
    To help keep the house free of clutter, the full-size refrigerator was hidden in a basement utility room. An unobtrusive three-foot-tall fridge and matching freezer—made by Sub-Zero—were tucked beneath a kitchen countertop. “There are so many more options with refrigeration, and under-the-counter is really great,” says Vetter. “You free up space and don’t have this big, clunky thing sitting there.” www.subzero.com

    Photo by: J.J. Sulin

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