written by:
photos by:
September 25, 2011
Originally published in Made in the USA

Architect Steve Bull designed a high-impact, low-maintenance home for a pair of intrepid clients in Alaska, but that was only the beginning of the adventure.

The facade of the Leiniche Navitsky residence.
Prayer flags flutter alongside Leinicke and Navitsky's house, which was designed by Steve Bull to require very little upkeep, both inside and out.
Photo by 
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The exterior deck featuring standing-seam metal siding and yard of the Leiniche Navitsky residence.
The standing-seam metal siding was rolled on site in an effort to reduce waste. It was prefinished with Kynar paint in the color Preweathered Galvalume.
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The open-plan living room of the Leiniche Navitsky residence featuring a durable sofa and table from Room & Board.
The open-plan living room and kitchen are a giant playground for five-year-old Suresh and his parents, as is the durable sofa and table base from Room & Board. Steel alcoves inset into the white-stained cedar wall shelter firewood, books, and treasured objects.
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The open-plan kitchen of the Leiniche Navitsky residence featuring a CB2 rug.
The thick peacock rug from CB2 offers a cushioned surface for energetic play.
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The loft above the living room in the Leiniche Navitsky residence featuring clerestory windows.
The loft above the living room is Suresh's terrain, given over to toys, books, and a colorful Lego table. The Clerestory windows maximize the natural light in the house—essential since there are only three hours of sun on a typical winter day.
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The meditation room in the Leiniche Navitsky residence featuring tatami mats.
The meditation room has a low narrow window overlooking a birch grove. The tatami mats are from the website orientalfurniture.com.
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The back deck of the Leiniche Navitsky residence featuring standing-seam metal siding.
Hands OffArchitect Steve Bull aimed to create a home for Leinicke and Navitsky that was virtually maintenance-free. To that end, the exterior is standing-seam metal siding that will never need to be painted; the cedar walls are finished with an eco-friendly Osmo semisolid stain rather than paint; and the floors are end-grain fir, a recycled by-product of door manufacturing that “is so tough it will outlast most buildings,” says Bull.

custombiltmetals.com

osmona.com

oregonlumber.com

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A Weil-McLain gas-fired boiler and underfloor radiant heating system which provides heat in the Leiniche Navitsky residence.
MicromanagementA Weil-McLain gas-fired boiler and underfloor radiant heating keep the house comfortable year-round—as do the individual programmable thermostats installed in almost every room, seven in all. That means the couple can lower the heat in rooms they use less frequently while keeping things toasty in the places they spend the most time. It’s a smart way to maximize energy efficiency through Alaska’s disparate seasons.

weil-mclain.com

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Sophisticated Juno track lights in the Leiniche Navitsky residence.
Back on TrackIn cold places, recessed lighting in a vaulted ceiling can lead to water vapor problems in the roof. So Bull inset standard surface-mounted Juno track lights into a notch. “With a flush track the common track light looks much more sophisticated,” he observes.

junolightinggroup.com

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The floor-to-ceiling pocket doors that slide into the wall in the Leiniche Navitsky residence.
Pocket Change“We wanted the main spaces of the house to flow into each other while still being able to isolate areas for pri­vacy,” says Bull, who designed floor-to-ceiling pocket doors that slide into the wall, closing off the bedroom wing, the med­i­tation room, and the entryway. “We spec’d Häfele Hawa Junior sliding door hardware. At about $225 per door it’s a bit more expensive than some other brands, but it is very smooth and quiet.”

hafele.com

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The facade of the Leiniche Navitsky residence.
Prayer flags flutter alongside Leinicke and Navitsky's house, which was designed by Steve Bull to require very little upkeep, both inside and out.
Project 
Leinicke / Navitsky Residence

Working as ER doctors at a hospital in eastern Anchorage, Alaska, Tanya Leinicke and Rick Navitsky are accustomed to high-pressure situations, like ministering to the aftereffects of moose stompings and bear maulings. So when two stressful events intersected at the same moment in the couple’s life—a political revolution in Nepal jeopardized their adoption of a son just as the design and con­struc­tion of their 2,100-square-foot house ramped up—they handled the situation with an uncommon meas­ure of grace and perspective. Four years later, the couple told us how it all began—and how hiring the right architect made all the difference. 

Navitsky: We came to Alaska from New Mexico in 2001, not necessarily to make it our home, but for adventure.

Leinicke: I had to pay back my Air Force scholarship to medical school, so I worked at the Air Force base in Anchorage for four years. We fell in love with the place. Every time you go outdoors you feel like you’re in a National Geographic article. And the community’s very strong. Alaska’s still the kind of place where if your car gets stuck in a ditch, three people will immediately stop to help you out.

The exterior deck featuring standing-seam metal siding and yard of the Leiniche Navitsky residence.
The standing-seam metal siding was rolled on site in an effort to reduce waste. It was prefinished with Kynar paint in the color Preweathered Galvalume.
Navitsky: We looked downtown for a house, but we weren’t able to find the right place. We wanted something small, efficient, and green, but also light and airy. Then a colleague told us about this property.

Leinicke: Land like this isn’t easy to stumble upon. We drove up, took a look, and were like, Whoa, we better buy this. Or somebody else will, quick.

Navitsky: On a clear day you can see the whole Anchorage bowl from here: Denali, the snow-covered Alaska Range, the three volcanoes to the west.

Leinicke: Finding an architect was easy. We had a close friend in Seattle who’s an architect and she recommended Steve Bull, the founder of Workshop AD. They’d worked together before, and she thought we’d be a good fit. We didn’t even talk to any other architects. That’s kind of how we are—we’re instinctual and we know a good thing when we see one.

The open-plan kitchen of the Leiniche Navitsky residence featuring a CB2 rug.
The thick peacock rug from CB2 offers a cushioned surface for energetic play.
At our first meeting, instead of asking us how we wanted our house to look, Steve asked us general questions about how we like to live our life. For example, he asked: “How do you like to spend the majority of your time?” We responded: “We like to play outside a lot, and we like to spend time with friends and family.” We told him we felt a family should be able to do different activities but all together. We also said we wanted to separate our bedrooms from our entertaining and play spaces—we work night shifts a lot, so we need a quiet place to sleep.

When we met again three weeks later, it was amazing how he’d incorporated our ideals and ways of living into a design. He created a house that feels like it’s outside, with large shared spaces and small individual areas. There’s a wing off the side, where the bedrooms and bathrooms are. It has a sliding door to accommodate our odd waking and sleeping hours. We can also shut it if someone shows up unannounced and there’s laundry all over.

Navitsky: As a Buddhist wannabe practitioner I wanted a space where I could meditate. Steve created a cantilevered room with tatami-mat floorsand a low window that looks onto the birch grove. That’s our guest area as well—we have a pull-out futon.

The loft above the living room in the Leiniche Navitsky residence featuring clerestory windows.
The loft above the living room is Suresh's terrain, given over to toys, books, and a colorful Lego table. The Clerestory windows maximize the natural light in the house—essential since there are only three hours of sun on a typical winter day.
Leinicke: Steve took our design education into his own hands. He discovered early on that we’re the kind of people who would rather take a free day to go rock climbing or on a long run with friends than to rip through design magazines. He totally respects that—he’s a cross-country ski fanatic and a crazy runner himself.

Navitsky: We mentioned liking Japanese architecture, so he brought us a few books and asked us to put tabs next to things that appealed to us. He also limited the choices for us—he’d hone in on a finite list of materials that he thought fit with our taste. He really made it easier.

Leinicke: At the same time as we chose Steve as our architect we started the adoption process. I think we sort of neglected to anticipate how involved we’d get in both efforts. Well into the design of the house we found out we could go to Nepal and meet our son—but because of political turmoil, we couldn’t take him home. So we started commuting between here and Kathmandu every six weeks. After our fourth visit we managed to push the adoption through. We got Suresh in February, and the house was done in March.

Navitsky: As a result, Steve probably had to be more hands-on during the building process than many architects.

The meditation room in the Leiniche Navitsky residence featuring tatami mats.
The meditation room has a low narrow window overlooking a birch grove. The tatami mats are from the website orientalfurniture.com.
Leinicke: In the end I think we benefited from that. Because we were gone so much, Steve had a lot of artistic freedom—and because of that a lot of great things happened in the house.

Navitsky: I have to say, we did not get stressed about building the house.

Leinicke: That’s the thing, when you rank your priorities—the child or the house—your child takes priority. It wasn’t as hard as you might expect. We love this house but at the same time we had this beautiful perspective. When you go to a place like Nepal, and all you can think about is your soon-to-be-son who lives in an orphanage, you suddenly realize how unimportant all the details are. You stop worrying about things like picking the right tile color. Fortunately, we picked the right architect.

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