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Coast Docs

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Law professor Carole Goldberg and sociology professor Duane Champagne both teach at the University of California, Los Angeles. Both have a love of books and cooking, and since marrying in 2003, they now share six kids and eight grandchildren as well. To design the couple’s green, familycentric beach getaway in Oxnard, California, architectural designer Daniel Garness—–who has offices in Los Angeles and New Orleans—–had a lot more to consider than how high to make the twin sinks. Goldberg tells us why the couple’s home is very nearly its castle.

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  The ground floor, which opens to the rear driveway and a pond in the private side garden, allows for easy indoor-outdoor dining and entertaining.  Photo by Shawn Records.
    The ground floor, which opens to the rear driveway and a pond in the private side garden, allows for easy indoor-outdoor dining and entertaining. Photo by Shawn Records.
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  Dan Garness used paint and well-placed windows to keep Duane’s office bright and airy.  Photo by Shawn Records.
    Dan Garness used paint and well-placed windows to keep Duane’s office bright and airy. Photo by Shawn Records.
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  Built-ins reduce the need for furniture.  Photo by Shawn Records.
    Built-ins reduce the need for furniture. Photo by Shawn Records.
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  Cedar louvers increase privacy and shade on the second-floor deck, where Carole and Duane relax with granddaughters Natalie and Allison and their friend Katherine.  Photo by Shawn Records.
    Cedar louvers increase privacy and shade on the second-floor deck, where Carole and Duane relax with granddaughters Natalie and Allison and their friend Katherine. Photo by Shawn Records.
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  Sunlight and shadows accentuate the architectural forms around the stairway leading to the roof deck.  Photo by Shawn Records.
    Sunlight and shadows accentuate the architectural forms around the stairway leading to the roof deck. Photo by Shawn Records.
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  Carole and granddaughter Allison—–silhouetted against a glass door that pivots open to the front garden—–plot how they’ll prepare the family’s next meal at the kitchen island.  Photo by Shawn Records.
    Carole and granddaughter Allison—–silhouetted against a glass door that pivots open to the front garden—–plot how they’ll prepare the family’s next meal at the kitchen island. Photo by Shawn Records.
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  After a day at the beach, an outdoor shower tucked toward the back of the house allows everyone to rinse off without tracking sand indoors.  Photo by Shawn Records.
    After a day at the beach, an outdoor shower tucked toward the back of the house allows everyone to rinse off without tracking sand indoors. Photo by Shawn Records.
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  To make the most of 13-foot-high ceilings that help draw hot air out through second-floor windows and doors, designer Daniel Garness painted select walls with playful color and lined them with maple plywood bookcases. Library ladders (about $1,500 each from Alaco Ladder Company) provide access to reading material and a sleeping loft.  Photo by Shawn Records.
    To make the most of 13-foot-high ceilings that help draw hot air out through second-floor windows and doors, designer Daniel Garness painted select walls with playful color and lined them with maple plywood bookcases. Library ladders (about $1,500 each from Alaco Ladder Company) provide access to reading material and a sleeping loft. Photo by Shawn Records.
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  Dan designed the office seating with the capacity to double as overnight accommodations.  Photo by Shawn Records.
    Dan designed the office seating with the capacity to double as overnight accommodations. Photo by Shawn Records.
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  Each sofa consists of two foam mattresses upholstered by Diamond Foam & Fabric. The mattresses can be stacked in their maple plywood frame during the day and laid out side-by-side to form a queen-size bed in the evening.  Photo by Shawn Records.
    Each sofa consists of two foam mattresses upholstered by Diamond Foam & Fabric. The mattresses can be stacked in their maple plywood frame during the day and laid out side-by-side to form a queen-size bed in the evening. Photo by Shawn Records.
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  Inexpensive muslin makes a lightweight and luminous covering for windows and the pivoting glass door in the kitchen. While the roll-up shades fabricated by Van Nuys Awning Co. resemble a ship’s sails, the hardware for the cords calls to mind boat cleats. Both are fitting nautical references as the house is located only blocks away from the ocean.  Photo by Shawn Records.
    Inexpensive muslin makes a lightweight and luminous covering for windows and the pivoting glass door in the kitchen. While the roll-up shades fabricated by Van Nuys Awning Co. resemble a ship’s sails, the hardware for the cords calls to mind boat cleats. Both are fitting nautical references as the house is located only blocks away from the ocean. Photo by Shawn Records.
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  The bathrooms feature Oceanside Glasstile recycled glass tiles from Mission Tile West, in palettes inspired by the home’s coastal setting. The ground-floor bathroom is tiled in brown like the earth, the guest bathroom in seafoam green, and the master bathroom in blue like the sky.  Photo by Shawn Records.
    The bathrooms feature Oceanside Glasstile recycled glass tiles from Mission Tile West, in palettes inspired by the home’s coastal setting. The ground-floor bathroom is tiled in brown like the earth, the guest bathroom in seafoam green, and the master bathroom in blue like the sky. Photo by Shawn Records.
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  The entrance to the master bedroom suite can be concealed behind a floor-to-ceiling door that Dan mounted on a sturdy track system and then sheathed in cedar. When it’s open, the sliding door blends seamlessly with adjacent cedar paneling and looks like part of the wall. All of the barn-door hardware from Specialty Doors came to about $1,000.  Photo by Shawn Records.
    The entrance to the master bedroom suite can be concealed behind a floor-to-ceiling door that Dan mounted on a sturdy track system and then sheathed in cedar. When it’s open, the sliding door blends seamlessly with adjacent cedar paneling and looks like part of the wall. All of the barn-door hardware from Specialty Doors came to about $1,000. Photo by Shawn Records.

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