written by:
photos by:
February 8, 2010
Originally published in Back to Basics

Relying on local materials, local craftsmen, and the land her family has farmed for over two centuries, a New Yorker rediscovers her Midwestern roots.

Lauren Ewing’s stylish but unassuming shotgun-style house in Vincennes, Indiana, is set into a hill overlooking a field she has known since childhood.
Lauren Ewing’s stylish but unassuming shotgun-style house in Vincennes, Indiana, is set into a hill overlooking a field she has known since childhood.
Photo by 
1 / 10
Ewing used Canadian maple for the hallway and living-room floors, giving them a bright, clean look. A built-in shelving system borders the hearth, creating functional and decorative storage spaces for firewood collected on-site.
Ewing used Canadian maple for the hallway and living-room floors, giving them a bright, clean look. A built-in shelving system borders the hearth, creating functional and decorative storage spaces for firewood collected on-site.
Photo by 
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The floor-to-ceiling living-room window was inspired by Philip Johnson’s Glass House.
The floor-to-ceiling living-room window was inspired by Philip Johnson’s Glass House.
Photo by 
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A leaf-green countertop adds a splash of color to the kitchen.
A leaf-green countertop adds a splash of color to the kitchen.
Photo by 
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The living-room sofa is by the New York–based designer Stanley Jay Friedman.
The living-room sofa is by the New York–based designer Stanley Jay Friedman.
Photo by 
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The surfaces of both decks—–including the small one off Ewing’s bedroom—–were fashioned from recycled plastic fibers.
The surfaces of both decks—–including the small one off Ewing’s bedroom—–were fashioned from recycled plastic fibers.
Photo by 
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Ewing designed a floor-to-ceiling window to provide an expansive view while bathing her living room in natural light. She hired D & H Glass, a local company that makes plate-glass windows for grocery stores, to join three standard-size windows, filling th
Ewing designed a floor-to-ceiling window to provide an expansive view while bathing her living room in natural light. She hired D & H Glass, a local company that makes plate-glass windows for grocery stores, to join three standard-size windows, filling the 9-by-18-foot space for under $4,000.
Photo by 
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Ewing’s builder, John Lane, used a front-end loader to stack slabs of Indiana limestone for the house’s front steps. Each slab rested atop a layer of ice cubes, creating just enough clearance for the nylon straps to be pulled free. The slabs settled into
Ewing’s builder, John Lane, used a front-end loader to stack slabs of Indiana limestone for the house’s front steps. Each slab rested atop a layer of ice cubes, creating just enough clearance for the nylon straps to be pulled free. The slabs settled into place as the ice melted in the summer sun.
Photo by 
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For the exterior and roof, Ewing chose Una-Clad corrugated-steel siding. The material, more commonly found on commercial buildings, is lightweight, durable, easy to maintain, and recyclable.
For the exterior and roof, Ewing chose Una-Clad corrugated-steel siding. The material, more commonly found on commercial buildings, is lightweight, durable, easy to maintain, and recyclable.
Photo by 
9 / 10
The cabinets in Ewing’s bedroom were made from wild cherry trees harvested from the property. The enormous trunks were too big to fit into the portable sawmill that her brother, Mark, brought to the property, so he blew them apart with dynamite and fed th
The cabinets in Ewing’s bedroom were made from wild cherry trees harvested from the property. The enormous trunks were too big to fit into the portable sawmill that her brother, Mark, brought to the property, so he blew them apart with dynamite and fed the pieces into the mill. The cabinets were made by Ewing’s friend Paul Keller.
Photo by 
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Lauren Ewing’s stylish but unassuming shotgun-style house in Vincennes, Indiana, is set into a hill overlooking a field she has known since childhood.
Lauren Ewing’s stylish but unassuming shotgun-style house in Vincennes, Indiana, is set into a hill overlooking a field she has known since childhood.
Project 
Ewing Residence

Rattled by 9/11 and worn down by 34 years in lower Manhattan, artist Lauren Ewing wanted to build a retreat where she could escape the city for a few weeks or months at a time. Ewing, a sculptor and Rutgers University art professor, considered sites in the Northeast but eventually turned to the 500-acre property in Vincennes, Indiana, that her family has farmed since 1806. The house she designed—–a version of the venerable Southern-style shotgun house, updated with a modernist flair—–has given her a place to unwind and reconnect with her Midwestern roots.

I went away to school when I was 17, and for the next 40 years I basically came back here occasionally on vacation, and that was it. After 9/11, I had witnessed not only my whole life but also my whole neighborhood and community change overnight.

I decided to build a house in a place that was kind of a refuge, where I could be self-sufficient if I needed to. And I wanted to spend time with my brother, Mark, who was just seven when I went away to school. I had looked in other places. I thought, Well, I’ll build a house on Cape Cod or Long Island, because

Ewing used Canadian maple for the hallway and living-room floors, giving them a bright, clean look. A built-in shelving system borders the hearth, creating functional and decorative storage spaces for firewood collected on-site.
Ewing used Canadian maple for the hallway and living-room floors, giving them a bright, clean look. A built-in shelving system borders the hearth, creating functional and decorative storage spaces for firewood collected on-site.

I’m a kayaker and I love the water. And, you know, the real estate prices are just insane. I wanted to be efficient about what I did and I built this whole house in Indiana for $300,000.

I’ve always loved what I call “the wisdom of poor architecture.” I traveled to Louisville, Kentucky, with my brother, and I realized that it was the shotgun house that I really loved. It’s eccentric in its proportions. It’s what a kid draws when he draws a house; it’s an archetype of a house.

So this is just a big shotgun house: a single gable that runs from end to end without any beams and was efficient to build. I knew I could get 60 floor joists that were exactly the same and 60 roof trusses that were exactly the same and that I could create a shape that would remain true.

The floor-to-ceiling living-room window was inspired by Philip Johnson’s Glass House.
The floor-to-ceiling living-room window was inspired by Philip Johnson’s Glass House.

This is a two-bedroom house with only one bathroom, a kitchen, and a very large studio/living room. There are decks on both ends—–including a reading deck off my bedroom. And then it has a full basement, which houses one of my studios and is poured concrete, so it’s wonderfully cool.

There aren’t a lot of windows on the  front of the house. One of my themes was to come into what looks like a closed space and then have the whole house open up when you walk in.

A leaf-green countertop adds a splash of color to the kitchen.
A leaf-green countertop adds a splash of color to the kitchen.

I wanted to make something that was going to be easy to take care of, too, so I sided the whole house in corrugated metal, the kind that’s usually used in the great big distribution warehouses that you see off highways. But I like it because the coatings of color are baked on, and the siding has a 25-year guarantee. For the exterior I picked Wedgwood blue. The walnut trees are yellow and the maples are orange and yellow, so it looks absolutely stunning in the fall. It’s a very cool, very recessive color—–almost the color of a shadow—–so it doesn’t stand out. It sort of sits back.

My brother did all the road building, landscaping, and tree clearing. I used a local company to make the doors, and a glass company that puts windows in grocery stores to do my studio window. I used solid Indiana limestone for the steps and Indiana sandstone for the hearth. The entire house was built with local materials and local craftsmen. These weren’t exotic choices, but they’re practical.

One of my extravagances was to get Canadian maple for the studio and hallway floors, because I wanted something that was almost pattern-free. One of the bedroom floors is maple that was taken from this site, and the other bedroom is ash, which was harvested on-site as well. All of the cabinetry is made from wild cherry, which we have in another field on the property.

The whole house opens up to the north, so I never turn the lights on until nine o’clock at night in the summer. I get this wonderful colorless, shadowless light all day long.

The surfaces of both decks—–including the small one off Ewing’s bedroom—–were fashioned from recycled plastic fibers.
The surfaces of both decks—–including the small one off Ewing’s bedroom—–were fashioned from recycled plastic fibers.

I wanted the front of the house to look out on this wonderful little valley, which goes through the most dramatic changes. It’s beautiful here. It’s just a different world, and it’s a world that I basically didn’t have time for as a younger person. As I get older, I want to have time for it. I want to be here. It’s easier on my body and my brain.

I love New York. There’s the most critical and interested art audience in the smallest geographical area of any place in the world, so it’s very intense. And I like that. But I like this too.
 

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