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An Airy Addition to a Historic Boise Home

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An airy addition on the back of a historic house in Boise is a model of sensitive renovation, seamlessly melding new and old.

  • 
    Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
    Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
  • 
  The front of the 1910 house belies the modern extension architects Doug 
Skidmore and Heidi Beebe created to 
extend the family’s living space.  Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
    The front of the 1910 house belies the modern extension architects Doug Skidmore and Heidi Beebe created to extend the family’s living space. Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
  • 
  The home’s original living and dining rooms were updated with custom cabinetry and new fir floors. The living room sofa, coffee table, and lounge chair are from Blu Dot.  Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
    The home’s original living and dining rooms were updated with custom cabinetry and new fir floors. The living room sofa, coffee table, and lounge chair are from Blu Dot. Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
  • 
  In the dining room, the vintage table and chairs are set off by a Modo Chandelier from Roll & Hill and a vibrantly patterned Anthropologie rug.  Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
    In the dining room, the vintage table and chairs are set off by a Modo Chandelier from Roll & Hill and a vibrantly patterned Anthropologie rug. Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
  • 
  Playful wallpaper from Graham & Brown livens up the house’s otherwise staid 
powder room, which also contains a 
pint-size Ikea sink.  Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
    Playful wallpaper from Graham & Brown livens up the house’s otherwise staid powder room, which also contains a pint-size Ikea sink. Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
  • 
  A former 
closet was transformed into a double-height library, complete with a reading nook and a rolling ladder from Spiral 
Stairs of America. “That’s my 
favorite part of the house,” says Dan. 
“When I see Stella reaching for a book, 
there’s nothing better.”  Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
    A former closet was transformed into a double-height library, complete with a reading nook and a rolling ladder from Spiral Stairs of America. “That’s my favorite part of the house,” says Dan. “When I see Stella reaching for a book, there’s nothing better.” Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
  • 
  To help define the kitchen, the architects designed a wall of storage with cubbies 
on one side and a pantry with appliances on the other. Colorful doors add 
a playful touch, and DP3 Series cabinet pulls from Doug Mockett & Company keep the surfaces streamlined.  Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
    To help define the kitchen, the architects designed a wall of storage with cubbies on one side and a pantry with appliances on the other. Colorful doors add a playful touch, and DP3 Series cabinet pulls from Doug Mockett & Company keep the surfaces streamlined. Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
  • 
  To maximize light, Dana opted for white surfaces, from the custom cabinetry to the Silestone countertops. “You can’t put a lemon or a Popsicle down on marble, so we got quartz, which is virtually indestructible,” she says.  Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
    To maximize light, Dana opted for white surfaces, from the custom cabinetry to the Silestone countertops. “You can’t put a lemon or a Popsicle down on marble, so we got quartz, which is virtually indestructible,” she says. Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
  • 
  Preservation Props
Since the house is in a historic district, Beebe and Skidmore’s interventions were constrained by local guidelines, including a stipulation that the walls of the addition couldn’t line up with the walls of the existing house. They bumped the walls in by five feet on either side and painted the addition, clad in siding from Capital Lumber, 
a color complementary to the original building’s deep, bright blue. “A guy from Boise’s preservation office came by and said, ‘This is a perfect example of how we’d like people 
to build additions,’” says Dana. “We were pretty proud of that.”
beebeskidmore.com
capital-lumber.com  Photo by Lincoln Barbour.

    Preservation Props

    Since the house is in a historic district, Beebe and Skidmore’s interventions were constrained by local guidelines, including a stipulation that the walls of the addition couldn’t line up with the walls of the existing house. They bumped the walls in by five feet on either side and painted the addition, clad in siding from Capital Lumber, a color complementary to the original building’s deep, bright blue. “A guy from Boise’s preservation office came by and said, ‘This is a perfect example of how we’d like people to build additions,’” says Dana. “We were pretty proud of that.” beebeskidmore.com capital-lumber.com Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
  • 
  Easy Transitions
To visually connect the kitchen with the outdoor covered patio, the 
architects installed a cedar ceiling that flows from interior to exterior, peppered with an uninterrupted grid of Iside 2 puck lights from Leucos USA. Bifold accordion doors by Sierra Pacific open all the way, allowing the Zuckermans’ large dinner parties to spill outside.
leucosusa.com
sierrapacificwindows.com  Photo by Lincoln Barbour.

    Easy Transitions

    To visually connect the kitchen with the outdoor covered patio, the architects installed a cedar ceiling that flows from interior to exterior, peppered with an uninterrupted grid of Iside 2 puck lights from Leucos USA. Bifold accordion doors by Sierra Pacific open all the way, allowing the Zuckermans’ large dinner parties to spill outside. leucosusa.com sierrapacificwindows.com Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
  • 
  Work It
“We wanted to open up the back of the house, but there’s nothing to look at,” says Dana. “So we decided to put something in our yard as a focal point, to create our own view.” The architects came up with a glass-walled studio, which Dana uses as 
her home office. The architects mounted a steel I-beam that spans the yard, with holes drilled at eight-inch intervals for maximum flexibility of use. Right now it’s used for Ikea play equipment, but later they plan to hang a hammock and a movie screen.
ikea.com  Photo by Lincoln Barbour.

    Work It

    “We wanted to open up the back of the house, but there’s nothing to look at,” says Dana. “So we decided to put something in our yard as a focal point, to create our own view.” The architects came up with a glass-walled studio, which Dana uses as her home office. The architects mounted a steel I-beam that spans the yard, with holes drilled at eight-inch intervals for maximum flexibility of use. Right now it’s used for Ikea play equipment, but later they plan to hang a hammock and a movie screen. ikea.com Photo by Lincoln Barbour.

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