Actor Bryan Cranston's Green Beach House Renovation

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June 13, 2013
The star of Breaking Bad opens the doors to his family’s recently completed beach house located just outside of Los Angeles. Read Full Article
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  Bryan Cranston and his wife, Robin Dearden, relax on a Lagune sofa by Roche Bobois. The couple’s home occupies a beachfront site that they’ve owned for several years. The original structure, affectionately dubbed the “love shack” was born as 1940s-era military housing that in subsequent decades became an uneven hodgepodge that defied local permits and was slowly sinking into the sand.To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    Bryan Cranston and his wife, Robin Dearden, relax on a Lagune sofa by Roche Bobois. The couple’s home occupies a beachfront site that they’ve owned for several years. The original structure, affectionately dubbed the “love shack” was born as 1940s-era military housing that in subsequent decades became an uneven hodgepodge that defied local permits and was slowly sinking into the sand.

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  Cranston collaborated with project designer John A. Turturro and builder Bryan Henson of Allen Associates on the 2,400-square-foot house. The architect of record is Larry Graves of Alliance Design Group. Eco-conscious materials were key: In the kitchen, Poggenpohl cabinets were chosen for their recycled wood content and for the company’s low-waste factory efficiency. The Sub-Zero Wolf refrigerator uses less energy than a 100-watt light bulb.Roche Bobois Ublo barstools pull up to the kitchen island; a Reduced fixture from Louis Poulsen hangs above. The dining area features a Lunch Time dining table and Chabada chairs, also from Roche Bobois. To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    Cranston collaborated with project designer John A. Turturro and builder Bryan Henson of Allen Associates on the 2,400-square-foot house. The architect of record is Larry Graves of Alliance Design Group. Eco-conscious materials were key: In the kitchen, Poggenpohl cabinets were chosen for their recycled wood content and for the company’s low-waste factory efficiency. The Sub-Zero Wolf refrigerator uses less energy than a 100-watt light bulb.

    Roche Bobois Ublo barstools pull up to the kitchen island; a Reduced fixture from Louis Poulsen hangs above. The dining area features a Lunch Time dining table and Chabada chairs, also from Roche Bobois.

     

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  A detail shot shows a small aperture between the kitchen wall and the deck outside, where the family likes to grill.To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    A detail shot shows a small aperture between the kitchen wall and the deck outside, where the family likes to grill.

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  Bryan and Robin relax in a corner of the living room; the custom rug is from the Rug Affair.To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    Bryan and Robin relax in a corner of the living room; the custom rug is from the Rug Affair.

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  Outside the living room is outdoor furniture by Richard Frinier for Brown Jordan, selected for its powder-coated cast aluminum and its easily reupholstered slings. The deck, warmed by radiant heat, is poured-in-place structural concrete slab consisting of 25 percent fly ash, a coal-burning by-product that increases the durability of the concrete. The railing is a custom creation of project designer John A. Turturro’s and was fabricated by Trico Welding.To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    Outside the living room is outdoor furniture by Richard Frinier for Brown Jordan, selected for its powder-coated cast aluminum and its easily reupholstered slings. The deck, warmed by radiant heat, is poured-in-place structural concrete slab consisting of 25 percent fly ash, a coal-burning by-product that increases the durability of the concrete. The railing is a custom creation of project designer John A. Turturro’s and was fabricated by Trico Welding.

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  In a bedroom that’s used for guests, Robin demonstrates a foldable Murphy bed system, the Nuovoliola ’10 from Clei/Resource Furniture. The artwork, Orange Fish, is by Pablo Campos.To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    In a bedroom that’s used for guests, Robin demonstrates a foldable Murphy bed system, the Nuovoliola ’10 from Clei/Resource Furniture. The artwork, Orange Fish, is by Pablo Campos.

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  “Efficiency is really important, even more so when you’re dealing with minimal square footage,” Cranston explains. To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    “Efficiency is really important, even more so when you’re dealing with minimal square footage,” Cranston explains. 

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  “I’m a stickler—I want every square inch to make sense,” Cranston explains.To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    “I’m a stickler—I want every square inch to make sense,” Cranston explains.

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  Robin adds the finishing touch to the Murphy bed system from Clei/Resource Furniture.To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    Robin adds the finishing touch to the Murphy bed system from Clei/Resource Furniture.

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  For the facade, exposed to the constant salt air, the team considered everything from copper or zinc to Kynar-coated aluminum. Eventually, a sample of titanium was tacked up for six months and showed no wear. “Part of the green philosophy is not just what is cheaper; it’s what’s sustainable,” Cranston explains. “The titanium cladding was more expensive, but this is a house we plan to be in for the rest of our lives, so we wanted something that needed virtually no maintenance.”To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    For the facade, exposed to the constant salt air, the team considered everything from copper or zinc to Kynar-coated aluminum. Eventually, a sample of titanium was tacked up for six months and showed no wear. “Part of the green philosophy is not just what is cheaper; it’s what’s sustainable,” Cranston explains. “The titanium cladding was more expensive, but this is a house we plan to be in for the rest of our lives, so we wanted something that needed virtually no maintenance.”

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  Crowning the interior hallway is a Louis Poulsen PH Artichoke pendant, designed in 1958. The narrow apertures were designed to funnel the ocean breeze, contributing to the home’s passive cooling program. The walls are covered in American Clay, which helps to control humidity.To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    Crowning the interior hallway is a Louis Poulsen PH Artichoke pendant, designed in 1958. The narrow apertures were designed to funnel the ocean breeze, contributing to the home’s passive cooling program. The walls are covered in American Clay, which helps to control humidity.

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  In a corner of the living room, recessed automated shades provide glare control. All of the house’s shades are programmed by season and time of day through both the Lutron HomeWorks and ELAN home systems, which can be controlled through Bryan’s iPad, even when he’s on location filming.To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    In a corner of the living room, recessed automated shades provide glare control. All of the house’s shades are programmed by season and time of day through both the Lutron HomeWorks and ELAN home systems, which can be controlled through Bryan’s iPad, even when he’s on location filming.

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  In the master bedroom, Azul Giorgione by Alberto Gálvez hangs above a locally manufactured bed from Soluzioni. The sheets, pillow cases and blanket are from Restoration Hardware; the decorative pillows and quilted coverlet are from Bed, Bath, and Beyond. To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    In the master bedroom, Azul Giorgione by Alberto Gálvez hangs above a locally manufactured bed from Soluzioni. The sheets, pillow cases and blanket are from Restoration Hardware; the decorative pillows and quilted coverlet are from Bed, Bath, and Beyond. 

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  “We should be creating more energy than we need in this house,” Cranston explains. The roof’s solar array, from Schuco, contributes greatly.  Photo by: Art Streiber

    “We should be creating more energy than we need in this house,” Cranston explains. The roof’s solar array, from Schuco, contributes greatly.

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  In the garage, a collection of smart-home technology is on display alongside a Bendpak Auto Lift, which builder Bryan Henson calls “an integral part of the house’s design: With the lift in place we met the county’s requirements for two covered parking spaces in a narrower garage bay. This freed up nearly 400 square feet of precious floor area on the other side of the house to accommodate both a mechanical room and a media room on the first floor.”Other mechanisms include a Broan whole house vacuum system that keeps the indoor air free of dust and allergens; a Lutron HomeWorks system that controls lighting and shades; an ELAN g! home system that controls irrigation, lighting, and security; and an AM House home-entertainment rack.To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    In the garage, a collection of smart-home technology is on display alongside a Bendpak Auto Lift, which builder Bryan Henson calls “an integral part of the house’s design: With the lift in place we met the county’s requirements for two covered parking spaces in a narrower garage bay. This freed up nearly 400 square feet of precious floor area on the other side of the house to accommodate both a mechanical room and a media room on the first floor.”

    Other mechanisms include a Broan whole house vacuum system that keeps the indoor air free of dust and allergens; a Lutron HomeWorks system that controls lighting and shades; an ELAN g! home system that controls irrigation, lighting, and security; and an AM House home-entertainment rack.

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  The renovated beach house's floor plans.To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    The renovated beach house's floor plans.

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  A "before" shot of the couple's original home before it was demolished to make way for the current residence. Says Cranston, "It was really fun—we called it the "love shack." But it truly outlived its purpose, and it was incredibly wasteful, energy-wise."To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    A "before" shot of the couple's original home before it was demolished to make way for the current residence. Says Cranston, "It was really fun—we called it the "love shack." But it truly outlived its purpose, and it was incredibly wasteful, energy-wise."

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  An original sketch of the couple's residence by project designer John A. Turturro of Turturro Design Studios and architect of record Larry Graves of Alliance Design Group.To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    An original sketch of the couple's residence by project designer John A. Turturro of Turturro Design Studios and architect of record Larry Graves of Alliance Design Group.

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  An early sketch for the centrally located living room. Project designer John A. Turturro worked closely with Bryan Cranston and Robin Dearden to select all the furnishings and interior materials. "John really knows his stuff," says Dearden.To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    An early sketch for the centrally located living room. Project designer John A. Turturro worked closely with Bryan Cranston and Robin Dearden to select all the furnishings and interior materials. "John really knows his stuff," says Dearden.

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  A drawing illustrates the two-part pivot and locking roof access ladder. To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    A drawing illustrates the two-part pivot and locking roof access ladder.

     

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  A drawing of the outdoor site plan includes a raised concrete deck, firepit, cut-outs, built-in furniture, and a lower patio.To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    A drawing of the outdoor site plan includes a raised concrete deck, firepit, cut-outs, built-in furniture, and a lower patio.

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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  An early study of a wind turbine for the roof, an idea that was eventually scrapped by the team due to permit and acoustics issues, as well as concern for native wildlife.To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com  Photo by: Art Streiber

    An early study of a wind turbine for the roof, an idea that was eventually scrapped by the team due to permit and acoustics issues, as well as concern for native wildlife.

    To learn more about the Cranston Residence project and its players, please visit www.3palmsproject.com

    Photo by: Art Streiber

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