February 6, 2013
In Warsaw, Poland, a resident breathes new life into an old apartment by dismantling, then reassembling, his late grandmother's hodgepodge of wooden furniture and creates a self-contained do-it-all solution that puts the "apart" in apartment. Story by Audrey Tempelsman.
In 2005, Krzysztof Kwiecinski moved into his late grandmother’s Warsaw, Poland, apartment. Not wanting to strip the home of its former life, he worked with local architecture firm <a href="http://www.centrala.net.pl">Centrala</a> to create the Hardbox, a

In 2005, Krzysztof Kwiecinski moved into his late grandmother’s Warsaw, Poland, apartment. Not wanting to strip the home of its former life, he worked with local architecture firm Centrala to create the Hardbox, a 12-by-10-foot freestanding unit from pieces of his grandmother’s hodgepodge collection of furniture.

Originally appeared in Handled with Care
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Kwiecinski’s 800-square-foot apartment (with its walls sheathed in flowing white curtains) is nicknamed the Softbox, in direct contrast to the Hardbox.

Kwiecinski’s 800-square-foot apartment (with its walls sheathed in flowing white curtains) is nicknamed the Softbox, in direct contrast to the Hardbox.

Originally appeared in Handled with Care
2 / 7
Kwiecinski and the architects at Centrala followed one rule when putting together the Hardbox: No panel could be the same color or shape, nor could they alter design details like moldings or keyholes.

Kwiecinski and the architects at Centrala followed one rule when putting together the Hardbox: No panel could be the same color or shape, nor could they alter design details like moldings or keyholes.

Originally appeared in Handled with Care
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Inside, the Hardbox contains a kitchen, toilet, shower, bathtub, foldout guest bed, and storage.

Inside, the Hardbox contains a kitchen, toilet, shower, bathtub, foldout guest bed, and storage.

Originally appeared in Handled with Care
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Among the pieces that comprise the Hardbox are both doors and doorposts—even one lined with faded pencil marks tracking Kwiecinski’s height as a growing boy.

Among the pieces that comprise the Hardbox are both doors and doorposts—even one lined with faded pencil marks tracking Kwiecinski’s height as a growing boy.

Originally appeared in Handled with Care
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In addition to the storage space hidden in the Hardbox, the white curtains of the Softbox apartment roll out of the way to reveal built-in shelving along one side of the unit.

In addition to the storage space hidden in the Hardbox, the white curtains of the Softbox apartment roll out of the way to reveal built-in shelving along one side of the unit.

Originally appeared in Handled with Care
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The flowing curtains of the Softbox open to reveal a bedroom at the opposite end of the apartment from the Hardbox. Read more about the Hardbox in our <a href="http://www.dwell.com/magazine/The-City-Life.html">September 2009 issue</a> and visit Centrala’s

The flowing curtains of the Softbox open to reveal a bedroom at the opposite end of the apartment from the Hardbox. Read more about the Hardbox in our September 2009 issue and visit Centrala’s website for a video of the Softbox and Hardbox in action.

Courtesy of 
Justin Reid
Originally appeared in Handled with Care
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In 2005, Krzysztof Kwiecinski moved into his late grandmother’s Warsaw, Poland, apartment. Not wanting to strip the home of its former life, he worked with local architecture firm <a href="http://www.centrala.net.pl">Centrala</a> to create the Hardbox, a

In 2005, Krzysztof Kwiecinski moved into his late grandmother’s Warsaw, Poland, apartment. Not wanting to strip the home of its former life, he worked with local architecture firm Centrala to create the Hardbox, a 12-by-10-foot freestanding unit from pieces of his grandmother’s hodgepodge collection of furniture.

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