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November 11, 2013
When architects fall in love, designing their own home can be both rewarding and challenging feats. Through compromise and collaboration, these couples successfully made their dream home a reality.

Architects Apurva Pande and Chinmaya Misra live in a cul-de-sac situated between Culver City and West Adams, outside of Los Angeles. "We live in an in-between of in-betweens," says Pande. Photo by Bryce Duffy.

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Originally appeared in Architectural Adventure
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The couple began designing fresh out of architecture school. "We were keen to break the stereotypical architectural career path, which renders inconceivable the possibility of architects fresh from school using their design education and training to build for themselves," says Pande. The Delhi, India natives spent over a full year working on the project without taking a single day off. Photo by Bryce Duffy.

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Originally appeared in Architectural Adventure
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The renovations succeeded in opening the space by removing walls to make way for more space and natural light. Photo by Bryce Duffy.

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Originally appeared in Architectural Adventure
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To stay within budget, Han and Mihalyo spent seven months and all of their free time building the house. As a result, the couple is well-acquainted with every square inch of their home. As Han says, “If there’s a nail in the wall, we know exactly what’s b

Outside of downtown Seattle, architects Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo of Lead Pencil Studio spent their free time designing their dream home on a lot that had been empty for 30 years. Photos by Philip Newton.

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Originally appeared in Brand-New Secondhand
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Even in ever-gray and gloomy Seattle, the 24-by-10-foot front window lets in enough light that the couple rarely needs to turn on any lamps inside the house.

The couple's dream home features porthole windows and unfinished wood, steel and concrete. Photos by Philip Newton.

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Sheets of hot-rolled steel were used as exterior cladding—as well as for parts of walls and countertops indoors—to heighten the industrial effect. “When hot-rolled steel comes out of the factory, it’s a very even-toned, blue-gray color,” Han says. “But we

It was important to the couple that the home focused on sustainability. The entire home is insulated at twice the value required by code and the second floor features a passive solar window. Photos by Philip Newton.

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Originally appeared in Brand-New Secondhand
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Modern house with greenhouse roofing wall

Designers Andrew Dunbar and Zoee Astrakhan embarked on creating their family's dream home within a budget. Photos by Justin Fantl.

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Originally appeared in Just Redo It
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Dining room with multiple shelving cabinets

Because of budget restrains, the couple was forced to be creative. "Small Ikea kitchens drive me crazy, but six kitchens' worth of Ikea cabinets can be made into something beautiful," Dunbar says. Photos by Justin Fantl.

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Originally appeared in Just Redo It
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Roof with vegetable garden and furniture

Eco-friendly meets luxury on the roof which features both an organic vegetable garden and a hot tub powered by a four-kilowatt solar array. Photos by Justin Fantl.

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Originally appeared in Just Redo It
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pande misra house exterior addition

Architects Apurva Pande and Chinmaya Misra live in a cul-de-sac situated between Culver City and West Adams, outside of Los Angeles. "We live in an in-between of in-betweens," says Pande. Photo by Bryce Duffy.

Photo by Bryce Duffy.

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