Green Prefab Homes for a Native American Reservation

written by:
July 14, 2014
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  Eagle Round House by Sustainable Native Communities Collaborative  Kunkel’s group designed the 1,300-square-foot Eagle Round House, a modified round living room with a central gathering space that encourages community while maintaining flexibility. Clad with straw bale and structurally insulated panels, this design-in-the-round structure also incorporate east-facing windows, so tribal members could rise and greet the sun each morning, a vital cultural imperative.  Courtesy of Make It Right.

    Eagle Round House by Sustainable Native Communities Collaborative 

    Kunkel’s group designed the 1,300-square-foot Eagle Round House, a modified round living room with a central gathering space that encourages community while maintaining flexibility. Clad with straw bale and structurally insulated panels, this design-in-the-round structure also incorporate east-facing windows, so tribal members could rise and greet the sun each morning, a vital cultural imperative.

    Courtesy of Make It Right.
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  Sustainable Village by GRAFT Design  The GRAFT team played with the teepee metaphor to create the Sustainable Village, a family-centric prefab structure that trades private rooms for a more pronounced central room, a symbolic fire pit around which the household can gather. Three modules, arrayed around the center space, represent the three poles of a teepee, with an east-facing kitchen to greet the sun, a single-level design to accommodate the tribe’s elderly population and a porch with mosquito netting to enjoy the short, humid summer. The single roof covering recalls the buffalo skins stretched around traditional teepee dwellings.     Courtesy of Make It Right.

    Sustainable Village by GRAFT Design 

    The GRAFT team played with the teepee metaphor to create the Sustainable Village, a family-centric prefab structure that trades private rooms for a more pronounced central room, a symbolic fire pit around which the household can gather. Three modules, arrayed around the center space, represent the three poles of a teepee, with an east-facing kitchen to greet the sun, a single-level design to accommodate the tribe’s elderly population and a porch with mosquito netting to enjoy the short, humid summer. The single roof covering recalls the buffalo skins stretched around traditional teepee dwellings. 

     

    Courtesy of Make It Right.
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  Architecture for Humanity Home  “We are enthusiastic about these home designs that reflect traditional life ways, while exemplifying deep green public-impact architecture," says Nathaniel Corum, architect, Architecture for Humanity.  Courtesy of Make It Right.

    Architecture for Humanity Home 

    “We are enthusiastic about these home designs that reflect traditional life ways, while exemplifying deep green public-impact architecture," says Nathaniel Corum, architect, Architecture for Humanity.

    Courtesy of Make It Right.
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   LivingHomes Design  “We believe Make It Right’s Fort Peck project will set a standard for sustainable community development,” says Steve Glenn, founder, LivingHomes.  Courtesy of LivingHomes.

     LivingHomes Design 

    “We believe Make It Right’s Fort Peck project will set a standard for sustainable community development,” says Steve Glenn, founder, LivingHomes.

    Courtesy of LivingHomes.
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  Method Homes Design  “The community engagement in the design process and overall mission of creating a holistically sustainable community have been inspiring to witness,” says Brian Abramson, co-founder, Method Homes.  Courtesy of Method Homes.

    Method Homes Design 

    “The community engagement in the design process and overall mission of creating a holistically sustainable community have been inspiring to witness,” says Brian Abramson, co-founder, Method Homes.

    Courtesy of Method Homes.
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