Advertising
Advertising

You are here

Design Tips for Privacy

+ Read Article
As the lines between our public and personal lives become increasingly blurry, designers are helping redefine privacy for the 21st century. Here we explore the new frontiers­—in residential architecture, product design, and furnishings.
  • 
  House O, designed by Jun Igarashi, forgoes hallways and interior doors in favor of casually interconnected rooms.
  Photo by Iwan Baan.

    House O, designed by Jun Igarashi, forgoes hallways and interior doors in favor of casually interconnected rooms.

    Photo by Iwan Baan.
  • 
  A sheer curtain screens the living room from the outside.
  Photo by Iwan Baan.

    A sheer curtain screens the living room from the outside.

    Photo by Iwan Baan.
  • 
  The black-painted volumes are positioned to jut out and away from on another, enhancing a sense of privacy in the wings.
  Photo by Iwan Baan.

    The black-painted volumes are positioned to jut out and away from on another, enhancing a sense of privacy in the wings.

    Photo by Iwan Baan.
  • 
  Sofia von Ellrichshausen and Mauricio Pezo’s reinforced concrete home in Chile stacks rooms for working in a vertical column atop horizontally-oriented spaces for living.
  Photo by Iwan Baan.

    Sofia von Ellrichshausen and Mauricio Pezo’s reinforced concrete home in Chile stacks rooms for working in a vertical column atop horizontally-oriented spaces for living.

    Photo by Iwan Baan.
  • 
  The designers clad all interior walls with thin strips of pine and built all the furnishings. In the bedroom, hinged panels on either side of the mattress provide hidden storage.
  Photo by Iwan Baan.

    The designers clad all interior walls with thin strips of pine and built all the furnishings. In the bedroom, hinged panels on either side of the mattress provide hidden storage.

    Photo by Iwan Baan.
  • 
  “We consider the notion of privacy to be protection of our own individuality.”—ArchitectS Mauricio Pezo and Sofia von Ellrichshausen
  Photo by Iwan Baan.

    “We consider the notion of privacy to be protection of our own individuality.”—ArchitectS Mauricio Pezo and Sofia von Ellrichshausen

    Photo by Iwan Baan.
  • 
  A bedroom occupies the top of each tower; a ladder leads to a sleeping nook and an east-facing window seat in the Sunrise suite.
  Photo by Iwan Baan.

    A bedroom occupies the top of each tower; a ladder leads to a sleeping nook and an east-facing window seat in the Sunrise suite.

    Photo by Iwan Baan.
  • 
  Renderings of Ed Ogosta’s as-yet-unbuilt Four Eyes House, designed for a family, reveal a quartet of towers rising from a ground-floor common space.
  Photo by Iwan Baan.

    Renderings of Ed Ogosta’s as-yet-unbuilt Four Eyes House, designed for a family, reveal a quartet of towers rising from a ground-floor common space.

    Photo by Iwan Baan.

@current / @total

Categories:

More

Add comment

By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.
Advertising
Close
Try Dwell Risk-Free!
Yes! Send me a RISK-FREE issue of Dwell. If I like it I'll pay only $14.95 for one year (10 issues in all).