6 Brazilian Projects We Love

written by:
July 9, 2014
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  São Paulo architect Isay Weinfeld's Casa Deck offers cinematic vistas, a lush garden, and a retreat from Brazil's largest city. Weinfeld’s cinematic streak is evident in the home’s interiors: he designed the entertainment center in the media room. The rug is from Clatt Carpete & Cia. Throughout the house, the Strozenberg family uses floor-to-ceiling curtains for privacy.   Photo by Matthew Williams.   This originally appeared in Cinematic Family Retreat in Brazil.

    São Paulo architect Isay Weinfeld's Casa Deck offers cinematic vistas, a lush garden, and a retreat from Brazil's largest city. Weinfeld’s cinematic streak is evident in the home’s interiors: he designed the entertainment center in the media room. The rug is from Clatt Carpete & Cia. Throughout the house, the Strozenberg family uses floor-to-ceiling curtains for privacy. 

    Photo by Matthew Williams.
    This originally appeared in Cinematic Family Retreat in Brazil.
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  For photographer Reinaldo Cóser and his family of four, the best way to deal with the sometimes-draining throb of massive São Paulo was to simply rise above. By keeping the front and back gardens at the same elevation as the living area, architect Marcio Kogan created one giant living space. A large overhang means that even on a rainy day, the Cósers can live practically without walls. The dining area is defined by a classic Oval dining table by Eero Saarinen for Knoll. Brazilian master designer Sergio Rodrigues did the matching pair of armchairs in the living room.  Photo by Cristóbal Palma.   This originally appeared in São Paulo, Brazil.

    For photographer Reinaldo Cóser and his family of four, the best way to deal with the sometimes-draining throb of massive São Paulo was to simply rise above. By keeping the front and back gardens at the same elevation as the living area, architect Marcio Kogan created one giant living space. A large overhang means that even on a rainy day, the Cósers can live practically without walls. The dining area is defined by a classic Oval dining table by Eero Saarinen for Knoll. Brazilian master designer Sergio Rodrigues did the matching pair of armchairs in the living room.

    Photo by Cristóbal Palma.
    This originally appeared in São Paulo, Brazil.
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  Fasano Hotels opened a sprawling hotel in Sao Paolo, Brazil, that highlights the natural beauty of the area.  The man behind the hotel’s strong structure and bold design is one of Brazil’s most renowned architects, Isay Weinfeld. With this project, his goal was to create a hotel that looked and felt as wondrous and peaceful as the nature that envelops it. The hotel’s façade is a stunning combination of wood, stone, and glass. Downstairs, the restaurant allows guests to enjoy the view of a pristine natural lake as they dine indoors or outdoors. Local design stores provided the furniture on the outdoor deck. On the floor above, the lobby terrace also overlooks the lake and allows guests to lounge and perhaps enjoy drinks and snacks while soaking in the views.     This originally appeared in Hotel Fasano Boa Vista, Brazil.

    Fasano Hotels opened a sprawling hotel in Sao Paolo, Brazil, that highlights the natural beauty of the area.  The man behind the hotel’s strong structure and bold design is one of Brazil’s most renowned architects, Isay Weinfeld. With this project, his goal was to create a hotel that looked and felt as wondrous and peaceful as the nature that envelops it. The hotel’s façade is a stunning combination of wood, stone, and glass. Downstairs, the restaurant allows guests to enjoy the view of a pristine natural lake as they dine indoors or outdoors. Local design stores provided the furniture on the outdoor deck. On the floor above, the lobby terrace also overlooks the lake and allows guests to lounge and perhaps enjoy drinks and snacks while soaking in the views. 

    This originally appeared in Hotel Fasano Boa Vista, Brazil.
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  Architect Lina Bo Bardi, born Achillina Bo in Rome in 1914, made an indelible mark on mid-century Brazilian architecture and design after emigrating there following the destruction of her office in Milan during World War II. This is the Fábrica da Pompéia, a São Paulo cultural center Bo Bardi designed in 1986.    This originally appeared in Lina Bo Bardi.

    Architect Lina Bo Bardi, born Achillina Bo in Rome in 1914, made an indelible mark on mid-century Brazilian architecture and design after emigrating there following the destruction of her office in Milan during World War II. This is the Fábrica da Pompéia, a São Paulo cultural center Bo Bardi designed in 1986.

    This originally appeared in Lina Bo Bardi.
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  The Paulistano Athletic Club in São Paulo, Brazil, (1958) is early statement from Pritzker winner Paulo Mendes da Rocha. The disc-shaped stadium of concrete with a roof suspended from steel cables, was the first in a series of innovative structures from the Brazilian Brutalist, including the Saint Peter Chapel, Forma showroom and Brazilian Sculptural Museum.    This originally appeared in Art Brut: Revisiting Brutalist Architecture.

    The Paulistano Athletic Club in São Paulo, Brazil, (1958) is early statement from Pritzker winner Paulo Mendes da Rocha. The disc-shaped stadium of concrete with a roof suspended from steel cables, was the first in a series of innovative structures from the Brazilian Brutalist, including the Saint Peter Chapel, Forma showroom and Brazilian Sculptural Museum.

    This originally appeared in Art Brut: Revisiting Brutalist Architecture.
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  The Brazilian National Congress (1964) is one of Oscar Niemeyer’s numerous contributions to Brasilia, the custom-built capital created out of thin air in the ‘60s, the National Congress building symbolizes the working of the legislative branch; two semicircles, one for the Congress and one for the Senate, are divided by twin office towers.  Courtesy of David Holt.  This originally appeared in Design Icon: Oscar Niemeyer.

    The Brazilian National Congress (1964) is one of Oscar Niemeyer’s numerous contributions to Brasilia, the custom-built capital created out of thin air in the ‘60s, the National Congress building symbolizes the working of the legislative branch; two semicircles, one for the Congress and one for the Senate, are divided by twin office towers.

    Courtesy of David Holt.
    This originally appeared in Design Icon: Oscar Niemeyer.
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