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Q&A with Japanese Architect Shigeru Ban

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The Japanese architect—and winner of the 2014 Pritzker Prize—is working with Muji on a new endeavor: using furniture as a module for prefabricated houses.
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  As part of the House Vision exhibition, organized by Muji art director Kenya Hara in 2013, architect Shigeru Ban was tasked with designing a housing prototype that relies on furniture to provide structure.  Courtesy of: Michael Gillette
    As part of the House Vision exhibition, organized by Muji art director Kenya Hara in 2013, architect Shigeru Ban was tasked with designing a housing prototype that relies on furniture to provide structure.

    Courtesy of: Michael Gillette

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  The interior is a spatially open layout with a flexible DIY storage system that supports the ceiling.  Courtesy of: Nacasa & Partners, Inc.
    The interior is a spatially open layout with a flexible DIY storage system that supports the ceiling.

    Courtesy of: Nacasa & Partners, Inc.

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  Load-bearing elements are clustered together in the form of storage instead of a typical post-and-beam format.  Courtesy of: Nacasa & Partners, Inc.
    Load-bearing elements are clustered together in the form of storage instead of a typical post-and-beam format.

    Courtesy of: Nacasa & Partners, Inc.

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  House of Furniture’s exterior, designed by Ban in collaboration with Muji, looks more like a pavilion than a box.  Courtesy of: Nacasa & Partners, Inc.
    House of Furniture’s exterior, designed by Ban in collaboration with Muji, looks more like a pavilion than a box.

    Courtesy of: Nacasa & Partners, Inc.

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  In 2013, Ban’s office introduced its new housing prototype, the New Temporary House, whose exterior is made of insulated sandwich panels and fiber- reinforced plastic.  Courtesy of: Hiroyuki Hirai
    In 2013, Ban’s office introduced its new housing prototype, the New Temporary House, whose exterior is made of insulated sandwich panels and fiber- reinforced plastic.

    Courtesy of: Hiroyuki Hirai

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  After the 6.3-magnitude earthquake in Christchurch, New Zealand, in February of 2011, Ban was asked to design a replacement cathedral for the city.  Courtesy of: Bridgit Anderson
    After the 6.3-magnitude earthquake in Christchurch, New Zealand, in February of 2011, Ban was asked to design a replacement cathedral for the city.

    Courtesy of: Bridgit Anderson

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  The proportions and floorplan mimic those of the prior landmark, though the new, temporary structure is built of paper tube modules.  Courtesy of: Bridgit Anderson
    The proportions and floorplan mimic those of the prior landmark, though the new, temporary structure is built of paper tube modules.

    Courtesy of: Bridgit Anderson

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