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Anna von Schewen

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While in Vegas for Surfaces and Las Vegas Market, I had the chance to not only take in the terrific 17 Swedish Designers exhibit but also chat with Anna von Schewen and hear her lecture. She spoke about Swedish history (lamenting a lack of a design award among the Nobel prizes and reminding everyone that Pippi Longstocking was a Swedish character), Scandianvian design ("We have a philosophy of openness, simplicity, and modernity," she said, adding that "recently the focus has been less about functionality and more about emotionality"), and Swedish product innovations (like the BabyBjörn and the Peepoo single-use, biodegradable toilet bag). Here, she takes us on a tour of her own designs.

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  The lovely Anna von Schewen.Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our  FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!
    The lovely Anna von Schewen.Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!
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  Hug chair for Gärsnäs. "For this, I wanted to transfer the idea of sitting in someone's arms. Here, the chair is the person hugging you, which is why it's called Hug. Technically it's quite special because it's made from a solid, pre-bent piece of wood that is then CNC-milled to get the final shape."—Anna von Schewen
    Hug chair for Gärsnäs. "For this, I wanted to transfer the idea of sitting in someone's arms. Here, the chair is the person hugging you, which is why it's called Hug. Technically it's quite special because it's made from a solid, pre-bent piece of wood that is then CNC-milled to get the final shape."—Anna von Schewen
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  Dress chair for Gärsnäs. "This is my latest design for Gärsnäs. It's an armchair or easy chair. In my studio, I have my computer, drawing board, and sewing machine, which is as important as the computer. By testing things, sketching things with the sewing machine, I find new textures, new things that inspire me. For this, I wanted to examine the beauty of wrinkles. Usually when doing upholstery, you try to get rid of them but wrinkles can be really beautiful."—Anna von Schewen  Courtesy of: Lennart Durehed
    Dress chair for Gärsnäs. "This is my latest design for Gärsnäs. It's an armchair or easy chair. In my studio, I have my computer, drawing board, and sewing machine, which is as important as the computer. By testing things, sketching things with the sewing machine, I find new textures, new things that inspire me. For this, I wanted to examine the beauty of wrinkles. Usually when doing upholstery, you try to get rid of them but wrinkles can be really beautiful."—Anna von Schewen

    Courtesy of: Lennart Durehed

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  Twist chair for Gärsnäs. "Gärsnäs is a fantastic company to work with because they produce most of their own furniture in a factory in Sweden and also because I can be inside the whole process and get to know all the people working with my designs. This is a basic chair but with a twist. It gives a strong character to an otherwise simple chair. And at first look, you might think it's made out of laminated wood but it's actually solid."—Anna von Schewen
    Twist chair for Gärsnäs. "Gärsnäs is a fantastic company to work with because they produce most of their own furniture in a factory in Sweden and also because I can be inside the whole process and get to know all the people working with my designs. This is a basic chair but with a twist. It gives a strong character to an otherwise simple chair. And at first look, you might think it's made out of laminated wood but it's actually solid."—Anna von Schewen
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  Merry for Gallery Pascale. "These were made in a car lacquer factory in Sweden. First they painted a truck, then my candleholders, then some cars. This was inspired by Swedish Christmas candleholders that are made of wooden balls—on big one for the candle and three small ones for making it stand."—Anna von Schewen
    Merry for Gallery Pascale. "These were made in a car lacquer factory in Sweden. First they painted a truck, then my candleholders, then some cars. This was inspired by Swedish Christmas candleholders that are made of wooden balls—on big one for the candle and three small ones for making it stand."—Anna von Schewen
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  Metro necklaces for Gallery Pascale. "Pascale Cottard-Olsoon, who runs Gallery Pascale in Stockholm, asked ten designers to design some homage to Stockholm for an exhibit called Stockholm Je T'aime. I was inspired by the metro line, which is a part of everyone's daily lives, so designed necklaces inspired by the different lines. The string represents the colors of the lines and each pearl represents a station on that line.
    Metro necklaces for Gallery Pascale. "Pascale Cottard-Olsoon, who runs Gallery Pascale in Stockholm, asked ten designers to design some homage to Stockholm for an exhibit called Stockholm Je T'aime. I was inspired by the metro line, which is a part of everyone's daily lives, so designed necklaces inspired by the different lines. The string represents the colors of the lines and each pearl represents a station on that line.
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  Bowl with Pewter Collar for Svenskt Tenn. "I had these pewter-and-glass bowls for the 80-year anniversary of Svenskt Tenn. The idea was that when you put something in the bowl or flower vase, the pewter ring makes you focus on what that something is."—Anna von Schewen
    Bowl with Pewter Collar for Svenskt Tenn. "I had these pewter-and-glass bowls for the 80-year anniversary of Svenskt Tenn. The idea was that when you put something in the bowl or flower vase, the pewter ring makes you focus on what that something is."—Anna von Schewen
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  Hemlis hangers for Ikea. "I designed these hangers for Ikea, which are probably my best-selling design. I wanted to do really good hangers that are good for the clothes and don't take up more space than needed. Recently, I was quite surprised to see an art piece at PS1 at the MOMA where an artist [Jacob Dahlgren] used my coat hangers to make a sculpture."—Anna von Schewen Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our  FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!
    Hemlis hangers for Ikea. "I designed these hangers for Ikea, which are probably my best-selling design. I wanted to do really good hangers that are good for the clothes and don't take up more space than needed. Recently, I was quite surprised to see an art piece at PS1 at the MOMA where an artist [Jacob Dahlgren] used my coat hangers to make a sculpture."—Anna von Schewen Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!

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