How To Remodel with Douglas Fir

written by:
June 5, 2014
Warm up a new addition or highlight existing architecture with the right choice of wood—we recommend Douglas fir, an evergreen conifer native to the western coast of North America.
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  Know the value of existing materials. When a couple decided to renovate their A. Quincy Jones-designed midcentury home in Los Angeles, they kept the tongue-and-groove Douglas fir ceilings instact (along with exposed concrete block, redwood siding, and abundant windows). Photo by Spencer Lowell.  Photo by: Spencer Lowell

    Know the value of existing materials. When a couple decided to renovate their A. Quincy Jones-designed midcentury home in Los Angeles, they kept the tongue-and-groove Douglas fir ceilings instact (along with exposed concrete block, redwood siding, and abundant windows). Photo by Spencer Lowell.

    Photo by: Spencer Lowell

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  Spiff up a humdrum fireplace by adding a new casing in the form of vertical Douglas fir slats, like this bachelor did in his Hollywood bungalow. Photo by Zen Sekizawa.  Photo by: Zen Sekizawa

    Spiff up a humdrum fireplace by adding a new casing in the form of vertical Douglas fir slats, like this bachelor did in his Hollywood bungalow. Photo by Zen Sekizawa.

    Photo by: Zen Sekizawa

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  When a Cincinnati architect was commissioned to add on a new master bedroom to a 1950s ranch house, he made the new space indoor-outdoor with a wall of folding Nanawall windows. The showstopping element for the room is the peaked Douglar fir ceiling rafters. Photo by Ty Wright.  Photo by: Ty Wright Courtesy of: Ty Wright

    When a Cincinnati architect was commissioned to add on a new master bedroom to a 1950s ranch house, he made the new space indoor-outdoor with a wall of folding Nanawall windows. The showstopping element for the room is the peaked Douglar fir ceiling rafters. Photo by Ty Wright.

    Photo by: Ty Wright

    Courtesy of: Ty Wright

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  Incorporate reclaimed Douglar fir when possible. Architect Michael Cobb used Douglas fir harvested from this California weekend house's site, such as on a sliding door outfitted with Swiss Rod SS hardware from the Real Carriage Door Company. Photo by Drew Kelly.  Photo by: Drew KellyCourtesy of: Drew Kelly

    Incorporate reclaimed Douglar fir when possible. Architect Michael Cobb used Douglas fir harvested from this California weekend house's site, such as on a sliding door outfitted with Swiss Rod SS hardware from the Real Carriage Door Company. Photo by Drew Kelly.

    Photo by: Drew Kelly

    Courtesy of: Drew Kelly

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  Use a classic modern material like Douglas fir to carry a consistent material thread from an existing structure to a newer addition. “We picked up on the Douglas fir casework and the travertine,” says the architect of this renovated beachfront abode near San Francisco. A two-and-a-half-foot-deep storage area, made from Douglas fir, runs the length of the far wall in each of the three rooms. Photo by Robert Schlatter.  Photo by: Robert Schlatter

    Use a classic modern material like Douglas fir to carry a consistent material thread from an existing structure to a newer addition. “We picked up on the Douglas fir casework and the travertine,” says the architect of this renovated beachfront abode near San Francisco. A two-and-a-half-foot-deep storage area, made from Douglas fir, runs the length of the far wall in each of the three rooms. Photo by Robert Schlatter.

    Photo by: Robert Schlatter

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  For a more contemporary application of Douglas fir, try it in a plywood version. The architect of this Ontario farmhouse chose the plywood version of Douglas fir for its rustic but distinctively non-urban look. Photo by Tom Arban.  Photo by: Tom Arban

    For a more contemporary application of Douglas fir, try it in a plywood version. The architect of this Ontario farmhouse chose the plywood version of Douglas fir for its rustic but distinctively non-urban look. Photo by Tom Arban.

    Photo by: Tom Arban

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