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June 5, 2014
Warm up a new addition or highlight existing architecture with the right choice of wood—we recommend Douglas fir, an evergreen conifer native to the western coast of North America.
modern dwellings kalmic house quincy jones living room sofa wool rug

Know the value of existing materials. When a couple decided to renovate their A. Quincy Jones-designed midcentury home in Los Angeles, they kept the tongue-and-groove Douglas fir ceilings instact (along with exposed concrete block, redwood siding, and abundant windows). Photo by Spencer Lowell.

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Originally appeared in Modern Renovation of a Midcentury House in Los Angeles
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Masculine design bungalow with wood fireplace

Spiff up a humdrum fireplace by adding a new casing in the form of vertical Douglas fir slats, like this bachelor did in his Hollywood bungalow. Photo by Zen Sekizawa.

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Originally appeared in Los Angeles Home with Wood-Clad Interior
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custom-built bed in Cincinnati

When a Cincinnati architect was commissioned to add on a new master bedroom to a 1950s ranch house, he made the new space indoor-outdoor with a wall of folding Nanawall windows. The showstopping element for the room is the peaked Douglar fir ceiling rafters. Photo by Ty Wright.

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Originally appeared in The Ultimate Indoor-Outdoor Bedroom
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natural building materials

Incorporate reclaimed Douglar fir when possible. Architect Michael Cobb used Douglas fir harvested from this California weekend house's site, such as on a sliding door outfitted with Swiss Rod SS hardware from the Real Carriage Door Company. Photo by Drew Kelly.

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Originally appeared in A Sustainably Built Weekend Home
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Lloyd-Butler’s second-floor office in the old house, which connects to the addition via the frosted-glass bridge.

Use a classic modern material like Douglas fir to carry a consistent material thread from an existing structure to a newer addition. “We picked up on the Douglas fir casework and the travertine,” says the architect of this renovated beachfront abode near San Francisco. A two-and-a-half-foot-deep storage area, made from Douglas fir, runs the length of the far wall in each of the three rooms. Photo by Robert Schlatter.

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Originally appeared in Highway Hideaway
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The home primarily features two materials: tile and wood. In between the dining room and living room, a fireplace is wrapped in floor tiles of a similar color to those lining the ground. Above, Douglas Fir plywood lines the ceiling. Rendely wanted a ceili

For a more contemporary application of Douglas fir, try it in a plywood version. The architect of this Ontario farmhouse chose the plywood version of Douglas fir for its rustic but distinctively non-urban look. Photo by Tom Arban.

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Originally appeared in The Farm by Cindy Rendely
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modern dwellings kalmic house quincy jones living room sofa wool rug

Know the value of existing materials. When a couple decided to renovate their A. Quincy Jones-designed midcentury home in Los Angeles, they kept the tongue-and-groove Douglas fir ceilings instact (along with exposed concrete block, redwood siding, and abundant windows). Photo by Spencer Lowell.

Photo by Spencer Lowell.

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