Advertising
Advertising

You are here

Dwell Home Venice: Part 9

+ Read Article

In this series, Sebastian Mariscal designs a home in Venice, California, that brings the outside in. We track the project from start to finish with future resident Michael Sylvester. Part 9, November 2011: Preparing for Slabs.

Dwell Home Venice has concrete slab floors. Some preparation is needed before we can pour our concrete. We here at Dwell have long been proponents of radiant heating, and in the slideshow we go over all of the steps needed to get a system in place.

  • 
  Wooden forms and steel posts are in place for the slab pour. Before we can pour concrete we need to compact the soil, install a plastic moisture barrier and a layer of sand, then install rebar and the radiant heating system.
    Wooden forms and steel posts are in place for the slab pour. Before we can pour concrete we need to compact the soil, install a plastic moisture barrier and a layer of sand, then install rebar and the radiant heating system.
  • 
  An example of the plumbing that is set in place prior to the slab pour.
    An example of the plumbing that is set in place prior to the slab pour.
  • 
  The soil between footings has been compacted and Visqueen, a brand of polyethylene plastic sheeting, has been rolled out and covered with a fine sand.This creates a moisture barrier that will sit under the poured concrete slab. In the image above the Visqueen and sand are yet to be placed in their final position.
    The soil between footings has been compacted and Visqueen, a brand of polyethylene plastic sheeting, has been rolled out and covered with a fine sand.This creates a moisture barrier that will sit under the poured concrete slab. In the image above the Visqueen and sand are yet to be placed in their final position.
  • 
  Rebar (reinforcing steel bar) is in place just above the layer of sand and Visqueen.
    Rebar (reinforcing steel bar) is in place just above the layer of sand and Visqueen.
  • 
  The home features radiant heating in the floors. Radiant heating works by pumping hot water through PEX tubes which are set in the concrete slab. This warms the slab which in turn warms the room. The red tubes shown in the above image are PEX tubing. PEX stands for Poly Ethylene Cross (X)-Linked which is a type of material and manufacturing method. Our PEX and other radiant supplies were sourced from Howard Industries, a major Los Angeles area supplier.
    The home features radiant heating in the floors. Radiant heating works by pumping hot water through PEX tubes which are set in the concrete slab. This warms the slab which in turn warms the room. The red tubes shown in the above image are PEX tubing. PEX stands for Poly Ethylene Cross (X)-Linked which is a type of material and manufacturing method. Our PEX and other radiant supplies were sourced from Howard Industries, a major Los Angeles area supplier.
  • 
  The red PEX radiant heating tubes are tied off to perpendicular pieces of rebar.
    The red PEX radiant heating tubes are tied off to perpendicular pieces of rebar.
  • 
  Water and drain pipes are in position ready for the slab pour.
    Water and drain pipes are in position ready for the slab pour.
  • 
  The red PEX radiant heating tubes gather at this manifold which will be installed in a utility closet under the stairs.
    The red PEX radiant heating tubes gather at this manifold which will be installed in a utility closet under the stairs.
  • 
  The master bathroom floor showing radiant heating PEX tubing plus various water source, drain and sewer pipes. The slab in this area will be poured to three different levels to accommodate a door tread plus two different wooden floor finishes.
    The master bathroom floor showing radiant heating PEX tubing plus various water source, drain and sewer pipes. The slab in this area will be poured to three different levels to accommodate a door tread plus two different wooden floor finishes.
  • 
  Many rooms in the house feature a sliding door that slips into a pocket in the wall, so the room opens up to the outdoors. The sliding doors are made of solid mahogany and feature a wooden base or sill that the door slides along. In order for this tread to be flush with the finished slab floor the concrete slab must be poured to a lower height where a tread will be installed. In this image above the green area marks the location of the tread and therefore the lower concrete level. The purple area is where the slab will be poured at finished floor height.
    Many rooms in the house feature a sliding door that slips into a pocket in the wall, so the room opens up to the outdoors. The sliding doors are made of solid mahogany and feature a wooden base or sill that the door slides along. In order for this tread to be flush with the finished slab floor the concrete slab must be poured to a lower height where a tread will be installed. In this image above the green area marks the location of the tread and therefore the lower concrete level. The purple area is where the slab will be poured at finished floor height.

@current / @total

Categories:

More

Add comment

By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.
Advertising
Close
Try Dwell Risk-Free!
Yes! Send me a RISK-FREE issue of Dwell. If I like it I'll pay only $14.95 for one year (10 issues in all).