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10 Tips for Clutter-Free Bathrooms

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How does one hide clutter in a bathroom without going full-on minimalist? Let these ten homes guide your way.
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  One way to ensure no clutter? Make the bathroom highly visible from the adjacent room, like this glass-enclosed bachelor pad bathroom in Brisbane, inspired by Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey. Photo by Richard Powers.  Photo by: Richard Powers

    One way to ensure no clutter? Make the bathroom highly visible from the adjacent room, like this glass-enclosed bachelor pad bathroom in Brisbane, inspired by Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey. Photo by Richard Powers.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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  A Zen way to hide mess employs great swaths of fabric. A guest bedroom-office-bathroom on the third floor of a converted water tower in Belgium employs floor-to-ceiling curtains to hide all storage in the open space and create a serene ambience for the bather. The tub is by Rapsel. Photo by Tim Van de Velde.

    A Zen way to hide mess employs great swaths of fabric. A guest bedroom-office-bathroom on the third floor of a converted water tower in Belgium employs floor-to-ceiling curtains to hide all storage in the open space and create a serene ambience for the bather. The tub is by Rapsel. Photo by Tim Van de Velde.

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  Get proactive about concealing chaos in the bathroom by choosing built-in wall vanities and medicine cabinets with storage. The master bathroom in this San Francisco Victorian were designed by Nilus de Matran and fabricated by George Slack. Photo by Dave Lauridsen.  Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

    Get proactive about concealing chaos in the bathroom by choosing built-in wall vanities and medicine cabinets with storage. The master bathroom in this San Francisco Victorian were designed by Nilus de Matran and fabricated by George Slack. Photo by Dave Lauridsen.

    Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

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  Another clutter-hiding trick is something of a bait and switch: Face cabinets in mirror for a room-doubling effect. In the bathroom of a Victorian terrace house in London, architect William Tozer designed a wall of cabinetry that is exactly the depth of a fat roll of toilet paper. Photo by Matthew Williams.  Photo by: Matthew Williams

    Another clutter-hiding trick is something of a bait and switch: Face cabinets in mirror for a room-doubling effect. In the bathroom of a Victorian terrace house in London, architect William Tozer designed a wall of cabinetry that is exactly the depth of a fat roll of toilet paper. Photo by Matthew Williams.

    Photo by: Matthew Williams

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  Sliding doors shut off the more unsightly parts of the bathroom. Go for matching wood veneer throughout for a serene visual effect, as well, as seen in the Gaboon-plywood walls of the McKenzie residence in New Zealand. Photo by Patrick Reynolds.  Photo by: Patrick Reynolds

    Sliding doors shut off the more unsightly parts of the bathroom. Go for matching wood veneer throughout for a serene visual effect, as well, as seen in the Gaboon-plywood walls of the McKenzie residence in New Zealand. Photo by Patrick Reynolds.

    Photo by: Patrick Reynolds

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  Follow the lead of this bathroom in a tiny New York City apartment and stow everything out of sight behind a tiled wall—even the laundry hampers. Photo by Ian Allen.  Photo by: Ian Allen

    Follow the lead of this bathroom in a tiny New York City apartment and stow everything out of sight behind a tiled wall—even the laundry hampers. Photo by Ian Allen.

    Photo by: Ian Allen

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  “Whenever you’re making a minimal bathroom, you always have issues with storage,” says the renovation architects of this historic home in Brookline, Massachusetts. The wall-hung Duravit sink leaves no place “to put all your junk,” so Klug and Butz added small shelf above. The space to the right, which appears as an extension of the shelf is actually a panel that hides access to the water tank of the wall-hung toilet, also by Duravit. Photo by Eric Roth.

    “Whenever you’re making a minimal bathroom, you always have issues with storage,” says the renovation architects of this historic home in Brookline, Massachusetts. The wall-hung Duravit sink leaves no place “to put all your junk,” so Klug and Butz added small shelf above. The space to the right, which appears as an extension of the shelf is actually a panel that hides access to the water tank of the wall-hung toilet, also by Duravit. Photo by Eric Roth.

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  It helps to be a minimalist by nature, and only need a small nook for toothbrushes. Atherton Keener made the bathtub and sinks in their shared house in Phoenix by hand, out of marine-grade plywood held together with aluminum spline joints and dyed with Behlen Solar Lux in jet blac for a seamless, tactile look. Photo by Ye Rin Mok.  Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

    It helps to be a minimalist by nature, and only need a small nook for toothbrushes. Atherton Keener made the bathtub and sinks in their shared house in Phoenix by hand, out of marine-grade plywood held together with aluminum spline joints and dyed with Behlen Solar Lux in jet blac for a seamless, tactile look. Photo by Ye Rin Mok.

    Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

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  Screens are a great, often inexpensive, and easily portable solution for hiding clutter in a bathroom. In the master bathroom of this Minneapolis loft, a bamboo screen sits beside a Deauville tub by Victoria + Albert. Photo by Dean Kaufman.  Courtesy of: Dean Kaufman

    Screens are a great, often inexpensive, and easily portable solution for hiding clutter in a bathroom. In the master bathroom of this Minneapolis loft, a bamboo screen sits beside a Deauville tub by Victoria + Albert. Photo by Dean Kaufman.

    Courtesy of: Dean Kaufman

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  In an especially petite space, there is absolutely no room for detritus. Encourage a streamlined approach by centralizing, like in this Toronto guest bathroom, where a mirror, soap dish, hand towels, and a tray hang from a modular floor-mounted Autopole shelf system by Alu. Photo by Naomi Finlay.  Photo by: Naomi FinlayCourtesy of: © 2012 Naomi Finlay

    In an especially petite space, there is absolutely no room for detritus. Encourage a streamlined approach by centralizing, like in this Toronto guest bathroom, where a mirror, soap dish, hand towels, and a tray hang from a modular floor-mounted Autopole shelf system by Alu. Photo by Naomi Finlay.

    Photo by: Naomi Finlay

    Courtesy of: © 2012 Naomi Finlay

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