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August 2, 2013
How does Emeco turn soda bottles into chairs? What's the trick behind the stitching in Ligne Roset's intricate Ruche sofa? Can you guess the magic number of veneer layers that go into Fritz Hansen's 3107 chair? Here, we reveal manufacturing secrets behind four pieces of modern furniture.
Emeco 111 Navy Chair

Each of Emeco's 111 Navy chairs begins life as 13 pounds of rPET plastic. See how recyclables become modern furniture here.

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Originally appeared in Final FInishes
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Ruche sofa process Inga Sempe for Ligne Roset

Despite its relatively simple-looking form, the Ruché is a highly labor-intensive piece of furniture, requiring a diverse range of craftspeople and talents. Each Ruché is made on demand, and with 35 fabric and leather choices, hundreds of color options, and four frame variations (natural beech or stained red, blue, or gray), the piece is almost endlessly customizable. See the manufacturing process here. Photo by: Nicholas Calcott

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Originally appeared in Ruché Sofa
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Workers then sand the chair forms by hand.

It takes nine sheets of veneer, two layers of cotton backing, up to five coats of paint, and 11 days to make a 3107 chair. We take you to the floor of Fritz Hansen's stackable-chair factory to show you how it's done. Photo by: Alex Subrizi

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Originally appeared in The 3107 Chair
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The Steelwood chair from Magis is a product of experience—the suppliers who punch the sheet metal for the back, which adroitly supports four legs and a beech wood seat, are among Italy’s most skilled metalworkers.

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Emeco 111 Navy Chair

Each of Emeco's 111 Navy chairs begins life as 13 pounds of rPET plastic. See how recyclables become modern furniture here.

Photo by Armando Bellmas.

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