January 1, 2009
Little Field of Flowers was first conceived in 2005, when, in the cyclical course of design trends, flowery was at the height of fashionability. Nani Marquina says, “We thought it would be nice to work with a designer who excels in floral creations, so we contacted Tord Boontje and asked him to send us a proposal.” (In 2002, Boontje had released his signature Garland lampshade, a paper-thin sheet of metal etched with pastoral outlines that the consumer pops out and forms around a naked bulb.)

Boontje’s studio responded to Nanimarquina’s request with an array of characteristic drawings—ornate winding patterns of flowers, leaves, branches, deer, birds, horses, and dragons—that looked like graphic updates of medieval tapestries. Nanimarquina’s Catalonian production team envisioned the designs as modern-day textured patterns on woven surfaces.
This is the Boontje illustration that Nanimarquina's design team used as inspiration in devising Little Field of Flowers.
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The Boontje studio provided no instructions for their design but rather illustrations that conveyed the nature of a pattern for the rug producers to interpret.
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nanimarquina little field of flowers boontje illustration
This is the Boontje illustration that Nanimarquina's design team used as inspiration in devising Little Field of Flowers.

Little Field of Flowers was first conceived in 2005, when, in the cyclical course of design trends, flowery was at the height of fashionability. Nani Marquina says, “We thought it would be nice to work with a designer who excels in floral creations, so we contacted Tord Boontje and asked him to send us a proposal.” (In 2002, Boontje had released his signature Garland lampshade, a paper-thin sheet of metal etched with pastoral outlines that the consumer pops out and forms around a naked bulb.)

Boontje’s studio responded to Nanimarquina’s request with an array of characteristic drawings—ornate winding patterns of flowers, leaves, branches, deer, birds, horses, and dragons—that looked like graphic updates of medieval tapestries. Nanimarquina’s Catalonian production team envisioned the designs as modern-day textured patterns on woven surfaces.

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