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Little Field of Flowers: Prototyping

“We ordered the first prototypes in an embossed pattern,” explains Marquina, who works with several Indian manufacturing facilities. The Nanimarquina team instructed the manufacturers to use a traditional rug-making technique called hand-knotting to transform Boontje’s iconic graphics into relief patterned rug samples. In weaving there is a warp and a weft. The weft threads weave over and under the tensioned warp threads, row after row, to create a surface. When hand-knotting woven carpets, the technicians tie knots to the warp threads and use a tufting gun to secure them in a rapid pulling motion.

nanimarquina little field of flowers first prototype
The first prototype was a traditional knotted rug that represented Boontje's illustrations as an embossed pattern. He didn't like them; Nanimarquina had to find a way to lend more movement and texture to the surface.

The resulting samples showed Boontje’s patterns through changes in surface level, but Boontje didn’t like them. “We then understood that he needed more levels of texture, superimposition, and movement,” Marquina says,“so we had to alter our manufacturing technique. Our solution was to make the flower shapes by die-cutting felt and placing the pieces into a thick woolen carpet, all in one shade.”

“We ordered the first prototypes in an embossed pattern,” explains Marquina, who works with several Indian manufacturing facilities. The Nanimarquina team instructed the manufacturers to use a traditional rug-making technique called hand-knotting to transform Boontje’s iconic graphics into relief patterned rug samples. In weaving there is a warp and a weft. The weft threads weave over and under the tensioned warp threads, row after row, to create a surface. When hand-knotting woven carpets, the technicians tie knots to the warp threads and use a tufting gun to secure them in a rapid pulling motion.

The resulting samples showed Boontje’s patterns through changes in surface level, but Boontje didn’t like them. “We then understood that he needed more levels of texture, superimposition, and movement,” Marquina says,“so we had to alter our manufacturing technique. Our solution was to make the flower shapes by die-cutting felt and placing the pieces into a thick woolen carpet, all in one shade.”

  • <h2><a href="http://www.dwell.com/articles/little-field-of-flowers.html
">Little Field of Flowers</a></h2><p></p>Take a passage to India with Barcelona-based rug designer Nani Marquina as weavers transform a Tord Boontje sketch by warp and weft into a blo

    Little Field of Flowers

    Nanimarquina—In 1987, Barcelona-based designer Nani Marquina established a textile and rug design studio. Since 1993, the company’s designs have been manufactured in northern India. Marquina has devoted her career to promoting sustainable ethics in production. Her definition of “sustainable” applies both to materials (her rugs are mostly biodegradable, and one, Bicicleta, is made from recycled bike inner tubes) and to fair labor and trade practices. In 2006, Nanimarquina introduced Little Field of Flowers, the first rug by Netherlands-born, England-trained, France-based Tord Boontje.

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