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October 24, 2013
From wood to steel to glass to cement boards, we give you the inside track on the materials and techniques needed to make your facade sing.
A modern addition in Newton, Massachusetts

A Boston couple with a large extended family updates its brick neo-Georgian with a contemporary addition clad in an elegant series of striated mahogany and glass. Keeping in theme with the neighborhood, the cladding on the main house and the pool house reference New England architectural traditions (board-and-batten and shiplap siding, respectively) without replicating them. Photo by John Horner.

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COPYRIGHT 2010, JOHN HORNER
Originally appeared in Facade Focus: Wood
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Labics took their design cues from the original structure’s history and function: The form of the industrial-looking double chimney, for example, was derived from an old stack placed on an adjacent farm. For the water feature, at right, a moat-like trench

An early-20th century Italian farmhouse breathes new life with stripped-down stone interiors and modern-day cladding embellishments, like the glazed curtain wall that opens up the house to surrounding farmland. Inspired by a detail in Adalberto Libera's Casa Malaparte on Capri (one of the owner's favorite buildings), the custom double chimney produced by Indar is formed by a fold of Cor-Ten steel inserted to the rear glass wall. Photo by Jacob Langvad. 

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Originally appeared in Somewhere Under the Tuscan Sun
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Storefront facade with salvaged double-insulated window glass panels

An architect and a landscape designer took ten years to renovate their 1908 Edwardian in San Francisco. The inch-by-inch process yielded some elegant and flexible living solutions, plus a salvaged streetfront facade that still stops passerby in their tracks. The insulated glass panes that are arranged in a shingle pattern are double-insulated window glass panels scored for free from several friendly contractors. Photo by Justin Fantl.

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justin fantl photography
Originally appeared in Just Redo It
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A dazzling display of colorful windows wraps architect Lorcan O'Herlihy's home, which is nestled among the ragtag beach shacks of Venice, California. The striking facade is comprised of standardized precast James Hardie board-formed cement paneling that he split in half and organized around the narrow windows. Photo by Misha Gravenor.

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Originally appeared in Kaleidoscopic Cabinet
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The woven wire steel mesh presents a semi-transparent sheath to the interior.

The 12-foot-wide building's severe lines catch the eye, but it's the rusting steel frame and exterior curtains of metal mesh that really demand attention on this architect's home/studio in Phoenix, Arizona. The curtain is more than a shade, instead, Matthew Trzebiatowski likens it to a veil. "There's so much intensity of the outdoor amount of lumens and lights," he says, "but when you're inside it completely evaporates, disappears." Photo by Gregg Segal.

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Originally appeared in Xeros Effect
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Minimal modernist home renovation in Germany

A family of cost-conscious Hamburgers converted a kitschy turn-of-the-century villa into a high-design home with a strict budget in place. To unite the quaint masonry of the original villa with the squat, ugly add-on built flush against it, the architects decided to paint the old-fashioned facade graphite gray and then covered the box next door in plain, light-colored larch. Photo by Mark Seelen.

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Originally appeared in Paint it Black
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The rear facade reveals a glimpse of the living room.

Nestled into the rolling English countryside, a 1780s gamekeeper's cottage—with thick walls of Bath stone—has been reinvented by architect Piers Taylor with the addition of a boxy glass pavilion framed in green oak and clad in tin. Photo by Ben Anders.

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Originally appeared in Taylor Made
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A modern addition in Newton, Massachusetts

A Boston couple with a large extended family updates its brick neo-Georgian with a contemporary addition clad in an elegant series of striated mahogany and glass. Keeping in theme with the neighborhood, the cladding on the main house and the pool house reference New England architectural traditions (board-and-batten and shiplap siding, respectively) without replicating them. Photo by John Horner.

Photo by John Horner. Image courtesy of COPYRIGHT 2010, JOHN HORNER.

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