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The 3107 Chair: Glue and Mold

A worker then places single layers of inner veneer on a conveyor belt that sends them through what looks like a doughnut-glazing machine, coating both sides of the veneer with a white liquid adhesive.

The veneer is glazed with adhesive.
The veneer is glazed with adhesive.

At the other end, the veneers are stacked into nine-sheet piles: a cotton-backed outer layer, four glue-covered sheets sandwiching three dry sheets, and another cotton-backed outer layer on top. These loosely stacked piles are rolled down another conveyor belt where a third man—–nearly all of the factory employees are men—–places them into the most impressive equipment on the site: the Sennerskov hydraulic form presses.

Here, at 253 degrees Fahrenheit and under 94 tons of pressure, the nine layers of veneer and two sheets of cotton become one piece of molded plywood. After two minutes in the presses, the forms are removed and placed in a drying area, where they sit for five days until the plywood has stabilized.

 

  • At the Fritz Hansen factory in Denmark, a worker inspects the paint finish of a Series 7 chair in front of a wall displaying just some of the wood and color options available.

    The 3107 Chair

    It takes nine sheets of veneer, two layers of cotton backing, up to five coats of paint, and 11 days to make a 3107 chair. We take you to the floor of Fritz Hansen's stackable-chair factory to show you how it's done.

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