Advertising
Advertising

You are here

01 Woodblocks

Woods’s prints begin as marker drawings on acetate. “We have a set of patterns that have been reduced from wood grain,” he says, “and we use them as a library, and change them around. So it really doesn’t take very long.” He sources the prints from his library and sizes them to register precisely on each panel of the furniture. Then comes what Wrong calls “productionization of an artisanal process.” While Woods would photocopy his drawings onto 1:1 sheets, glue them to the woodblocks, and cut the grooves with a handheld router, Wrong and Lauber turned them into digital files, which the computer numerically controlled (CNC) machine can rout without hands. Lauber simulated the irregularity of a vibrating handheld machine by drawing meticulously wobbly lines. While this step is computerized, the printing step–when the MDF woodblocks are applied to the furniture pieces–uses basic machinery. Woods used to press the blocks with a cast-iron garden roller, but it’s a diffi-cult way to apply even pressure, so the team decided to use a hydraulic press.
Image
Spray booth still life.

  • <h2><a href="http://www.dwell.com/articles/wrong-woods.htmll">Wrong Woods</a></h2><p></p>Step inside the comic-book world of Richard Woods and Sebastian Wrong and witness the right way their Wrong Woods line of graphic furniture is made. <p></p><p></p>Fea

    Wrong Woods

    Established & Sons—The Wrong Woods furniture series is a collaboration between designer Sebastian Wrong and artist Richard Woods for Established & Sons. Wrong creates the object, designing furniture pieces with unadorned surfaces. He sends them into production where Woods applies his signature prints of simplified wood grain in Technicolor. Livia Lauber, a young designer on the Established & Sons team, helps
    to streamline the production process. The plywood line, now composed of a night table, chest of drawers, bookcase, and storage unit, met the public at the 2007 Milan Furniture Fair, and again at Moss last fall in New York. On the eve of the line’s mass production, Dwell visited the factory, which is on the southern outskirts of London, England.

Categories:

dwell.com is your online home in the modern world. Join us as we follow our team around the globe on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest. Want more? Never miss another word of Dwell with our free iTunes app.

Advertising