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A Sustainably Built Weekend Home

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Alternative materials help a house in California’s wine country tread lightly on the land.
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  “Things that have the virtue of being simple have become some of the most complicated forms of construction,” Cobb says.  Photo by: Drew KellyCourtesy of: Drew Kelly
    “Things that have the virtue of being simple have become some of the most complicated forms of construction,” Cobb says.

    Photo by: Drew Kelly

    Courtesy of: Drew Kelly

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  Architect Michael Cobb used Douglas fir harvested from the site throughout the house, such as on a sliding door outfitted with Swiss Rod SS hardware from the Real Carriage Door Company.  Photo by: Drew KellyCourtesy of: Drew Kelly
    Architect Michael Cobb used Douglas fir harvested from the site throughout the house, such as on a sliding door outfitted with Swiss Rod SS hardware from the Real Carriage Door Company.

    Photo by: Drew Kelly

    Courtesy of: Drew Kelly

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  In the kitchen, Santa Rosa–based Reliance Fine Finishing applied a conversion varnish tinted with a green hue.  Photo by: Drew KellyCourtesy of: Drew Kelly
    In the kitchen, Santa Rosa–based Reliance Fine Finishing applied a conversion varnish tinted with a green hue.

    Photo by: Drew Kelly

    Courtesy of: Drew Kelly

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  For the walls surrounding the living room fireplace, Cobb specified high-volume fly ash concrete made with 
a by-product of burning coal in power plants that usually ends up in landfills.  Photo by: Drew KellyCourtesy of: Drew Kelly
    For the walls surrounding the living room fireplace, Cobb specified high-volume fly ash concrete made with a by-product of burning coal in power plants that usually ends up in landfills.

    Photo by: Drew Kelly

    Courtesy of: Drew Kelly

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