Open-Plan Concrete Home in Japan

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October 18, 2013
In Tokyo, Japan, where the houses are crammed cheek by jowl, two old friends from architecture school have created a 793-square-foot home out of canted concrete boxes. Read Full Article
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  After purchasing a thin, L-shaped lot in Tokyo, Tamotsu Nakada asked architect and friend Koji Tsutsui to create an open-plan concrete home to fit the site.  Photo by: Iwan BaanCourtesy of: Iwan Baan
    After purchasing a thin, L-shaped lot in Tokyo, Tamotsu Nakada asked architect and friend Koji Tsutsui to create an open-plan concrete home to fit the site.

    Photo by: Iwan Baan

    Courtesy of: Iwan Baan

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  Inside, the bottom floor contains the bedroom, off of which is the bathroom, with a tub from Kaldewei and a Duravit sink.  Photo by: Iwan BaanCourtesy of: Iwan Baan
    Inside, the bottom floor contains the bedroom, off of which is the bathroom, with a tub from Kaldewei and a Duravit sink.

    Photo by: Iwan Baan

    Courtesy of: Iwan Baan

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  “We adjusted the combinations to see what kinds of spaces they created in relationship to the site and the surrounding buildings,” his associate Satoshi Ohkami explains.  Photo by: Iwan BaanCourtesy of: Iwan Baan
    “We adjusted the combinations to see what kinds of spaces they created in relationship to the site and the surrounding buildings,” his associate Satoshi Ohkami explains.

    Photo by: Iwan Baan

    Courtesy of: Iwan Baan

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  The staircase leads to the living area upstairs.  Photo by: Iwan BaanCourtesy of: Iwan Baan
    The staircase leads to the living area upstairs.

    Photo by: Iwan Baan

    Courtesy of: Iwan Baan

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  Tsutsui continued the Oregon pine from the floor to the steel-reinforced cantilevered staircase, which appears to float above the floor.  Photo by: Iwan BaanCourtesy of: Iwan Baan
    Tsutsui continued the Oregon pine from the floor to the steel-reinforced cantilevered staircase, which appears to float above the floor.

    Photo by: Iwan Baan

    Courtesy of: Iwan Baan

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  Just above the small entrance vestibule, he incorporated a skylight, which brightens the space and allows a peek at the apex of the adjacent roof’s concrete overhang.  Photo by: Iwan BaanCourtesy of: Iwan Baan
    Just above the small entrance vestibule, he incorporated a skylight, which brightens the space and allows a peek at the apex of the adjacent roof’s concrete overhang.

    Photo by: Iwan Baan

    Courtesy of: Iwan Baan

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  Nakada works from an Alvar Aalto table in the living and dining area, adjacent to the kitchen. He saved on some elements, such as the plywood cabinetry, and splurged on others, such as the Finn Juhl chairs and Vilhelm Lauritzen lamp. A skylight beneath the angled roof allows in a sliver of constantly changing light.  Photo by: Iwan BaanCourtesy of: Iwan Baan
    Nakada works from an Alvar Aalto table in the living and dining area, adjacent to the kitchen. He saved on some elements, such as the plywood cabinetry, and splurged on others, such as the Finn Juhl chairs and Vilhelm Lauritzen lamp. A skylight beneath the angled roof allows in a sliver of constantly changing light.

    Photo by: Iwan Baan

    Courtesy of: Iwan Baan

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