New Zealand Goes Modern Part Two

written by:
November 26, 2013
From a remote and sustainable beach house, to a compact prefab vacation home, to an affordable hillside abode, we add three new stunning residences to our previously explored topic, New Zealand Goes Modern.
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  Three designers jump-start their practice with an affordably built abode in New Zealand. A promenade, playfully dubbed “the wharf,” offers a spot to catch morning rays. Photo by Paul McCredie.

    Three designers jump-start their practice with an affordably built abode in New Zealand. A promenade, playfully dubbed “the wharf,” offers a spot to catch morning rays. Photo by Paul McCredie.

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  Rookie firm Patch Work Architecture used locally sourced Lawson cypress to clad the exterior of a 970-square-foot house in New Zealand. Vibrant painted accents contrast with the otherwise neutral structure. Steel trusses, painted in a blue hue called Lochmara from Resene, are visible through the fiberglass panels on the veranda. Photo by Paul McCredie.

    Rookie firm Patch Work Architecture used locally sourced Lawson cypress to clad the exterior of a 970-square-foot house in New Zealand. Vibrant painted accents contrast with the otherwise neutral structure. Steel trusses, painted in a blue hue called Lochmara from Resene, are visible through the fiberglass panels on the veranda. Photo by Paul McCredie.

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  The second-story viewing platform was born from an onsite discovery. After framing the first level, Patch Work Architecture noticed a vista to the west and decided to add a window. Photo by Paul McCredie.

    The second-story viewing platform was born from an onsite discovery. After framing the first level, Patch Work Architecture noticed a vista to the west and decided to add a window. Photo by Paul McCredie.

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  Two doctors wanted their typical New Zealand home to function as simply as it looks. Remoteness is both the challenge and defining feature of the house: There is no electricity, water, or sewage main on the island. Their home is essentially a high-functioning cabin. Photo by Simon Devitt.  Photo by: Simon Devitt

    Two doctors wanted their typical New Zealand home to function as simply as it looks. Remoteness is both the challenge and defining feature of the house: There is no electricity, water, or sewage main on the island. Their home is essentially a high-functioning cabin. Photo by Simon Devitt.

    Photo by: Simon Devitt

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  A New Zealand family taps into the creative capital of architecture students to make their dream home a reality. A compact prefab vacation home in the seaside community of Onemana Beach is clad in plywood and vertical timber battens finished in Resene’s Lumbersider paint in Foam. Photo by Simon Devitt.  Photo by: Simon DevittCourtesy of: Simon Devitt

    A New Zealand family taps into the creative capital of architecture students to make their dream home a reality. A compact prefab vacation home in the seaside community of Onemana Beach is clad in plywood and vertical timber battens finished in Resene’s Lumbersider paint in Foam. Photo by Simon Devitt.

    Photo by: Simon Devitt

    Courtesy of: Simon Devitt

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  Sliding glass doors made from Viridian’s ComfortPlus glass and yellow cedar wood lead to decks flanking the kitchen and dining room. Photo by Simon Devitt.  Photo by: Simon DevittCourtesy of: Simon Devitt

    Sliding glass doors made from Viridian’s ComfortPlus glass and yellow cedar wood lead to decks flanking the kitchen and dining room. Photo by Simon Devitt.

    Photo by: Simon Devitt

    Courtesy of: Simon Devitt

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  The topography proved challenging so the designers elevated the house on piers. Photo by Simon Devitt.  Photo by: Simon DevittCourtesy of: Simon Devitt

    The topography proved challenging so the designers elevated the house on piers. Photo by Simon Devitt.

    Photo by: Simon Devitt

    Courtesy of: Simon Devitt

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