Modern Homes in Mexico

written by:
October 18, 2013
In honor of our just having landed at Design Week Mexico, Dwell presents a few of our favorite modern houses in the country.
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  For his lakeside retreat just outside Mexico City, architect Bernardo Gomez-Pimienta designed everything from the house to the chairs to the china. Here, his wife, Loredana Dall' Amico, checks out the view from the balcony. Photo by Paco Perez / Alluro.  Photo by: Paco Perez / Alluro

    For his lakeside retreat just outside Mexico City, architect Bernardo Gomez-Pimienta designed everything from the house to the chairs to the china. Here, his wife, Loredana Dall' Amico, checks out the view from the balcony. Photo by Paco Perez / Alluro.

    Photo by: Paco Perez / Alluro

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  The Gomez-Pimienta house has what some architects would call an upside-down plan, with living spaces upstairs and bedrooms below. The upper story is strikingly transparent; the lower is camouflaged by thick, foliage-covered walls, which keep the sleeping areas cool. Photo by Paco Perez / Alluro.   Photo by: Paco Perez / Alluro

    The Gomez-Pimienta house has what some architects would call an upside-down plan, with living spaces upstairs and bedrooms below. The upper story is strikingly transparent; the lower is camouflaged by thick, foliage-covered walls, which keep the sleeping areas cool. Photo by Paco Perez / Alluro.

     

    Photo by: Paco Perez / Alluro

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  Six years ago, architect Jorge Gracia came to Dwell’s attention with a house he built for his family that was radically different from any other in his hometown of Tijuana, Mexico, where the hillsides are peppered with unplanned, makeshift houses for the poor and pastel-colored, ersatz Spanish manses for the rich. Despite Mexico’s strong modernist tradition—think of the work of Luis Barragán and Enrique Norten—Tijuana hasn’t been its beneficiary. “I’m an architect in a city with no architecture,” Gracia told Dwell in 2005. “In a place like this, you have to ask a client to have faith, and faith to me has always been the belief in something you can’t see.” Photo by Paco Perez Arriaga.  Photo by: Gregg Segal

    Six years ago, architect Jorge Gracia came to Dwell’s attention with a house he built for his family that was radically different from any other in his hometown of Tijuana, Mexico, where the hillsides are peppered with unplanned, makeshift houses for the poor and pastel-colored, ersatz Spanish manses for the rich. Despite Mexico’s strong modernist tradition—think of the work of Luis Barragán and Enrique Norten—Tijuana hasn’t been its beneficiary. “I’m an architect in a city with no architecture,” Gracia told Dwell in 2005. “In a place like this, you have to ask a client to have faith, and faith to me has always been the belief in something you can’t see.” Photo by Paco Perez Arriaga.

    Photo by: Gregg Segal

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  The two structures that comprise the house frame views of the ever expanding city. The backyard is perfect for frolicking dogs and children, with concrete block walls just high enough to keep them in but low enough to not keep the city out. Photo by Gregg Segal.  Photo by: Gregg Segal

    The two structures that comprise the house frame views of the ever expanding city. The backyard is perfect for frolicking dogs and children, with concrete block walls just high enough to keep them in but low enough to not keep the city out. Photo by Gregg Segal.

    Photo by: Gregg Segal

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  In August of 2004, a weekend-long party took place at a new house in the Hacienda Agua Caliente neighborhood of Tijuana, Mexico. The house was raw and unfinished, with bare concrete floors and exposed nail heads, but the art that adorned the walls and the music that rocked into the wee hours was a culmination of years of pondering the urban state of this exploding city just south of San Diego, California. Photo by Gregg Segal.  Photo by: Paco Perez Arriaga

    In August of 2004, a weekend-long party took place at a new house in the Hacienda Agua Caliente neighborhood of Tijuana, Mexico. The house was raw and unfinished, with bare concrete floors and exposed nail heads, but the art that adorned the walls and the music that rocked into the wee hours was a culmination of years of pondering the urban state of this exploding city just south of San Diego, California. Photo by Gregg Segal.

    Photo by: Paco Perez Arriaga

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  Marco Becerril, at the left end of the table, presides over his extended family in the double-height dining area. Photo by Paco Perez Arriaga.  Photo by: Paco Perez Arriaga

    Marco Becerril, at the left end of the table, presides over his extended family in the double-height dining area. Photo by Paco Perez Arriaga.

    Photo by: Paco Perez Arriaga

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  On a gently sloping lot in the middle of a pine forest at the northern edge of Cuernavaca, Mexico, is a family compound with a recent addition conceptualized by local architect Alfredo Raymundo Cano Briceño of T3Arc.

    On a gently sloping lot in the middle of a pine forest at the northern edge of Cuernavaca, Mexico, is a family compound with a recent addition conceptualized by local architect Alfredo Raymundo Cano Briceño of T3Arc.

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  A view from the main house down the length of the bridge to the addition. Cano notes that there is no need to light the bridge, as the exterior lights on both structures keep it well illuminated, so little superheroes can find their way at night.

    A view from the main house down the length of the bridge to the addition. Cano notes that there is no need to light the bridge, as the exterior lights on both structures keep it well illuminated, so little superheroes can find their way at night.

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