Modern Homes in The Carolinas

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December 14, 2013
From the Atlantic Coast to the Blue Ridge Mountains, the Carolinas are known for their unique subset of Southern culture. Amidst a backdrop of aging farmhouses and Victorian-style plantation homes, these architects took a modern approach to the distinct Carolinian style.
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  Raleigh-based Tonic Design architects created this Hillsborough, North Carolina home's rain screen to eventually develop a rich patina that will compliment the surrounding century-old farmhouses in the area. Photo by Richard Leo Johnson.

    Raleigh-based Tonic Design architects created this Hillsborough, North Carolina home's rain screen to eventually develop a rich patina that will compliment the surrounding century-old farmhouses in the area. Photo by Richard Leo Johnson.

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  Also designed by Raleigh-based architectural firm Tonic, this gothic-inspired home on a 60-acre plot in Pittsboro, North Carolina was the dream of professional musician Michael Rank. Photo by Raymond Goodman.  Photo by: Raymond Goodman

    Also designed by Raleigh-based architectural firm Tonic, this gothic-inspired home on a 60-acre plot in Pittsboro, North Carolina was the dream of professional musician Michael Rank. Photo by Raymond Goodman.

    Photo by: Raymond Goodman

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  Four stories high, the 3,200-square-foot home features a stark yet chic black and white interior complete with a recording studio and room for the homeowner's muscle cars. Photo by Raymond Goodman.  Photo by: Raymond Goodman

    Four stories high, the 3,200-square-foot home features a stark yet chic black and white interior complete with a recording studio and room for the homeowner's muscle cars. Photo by Raymond Goodman.

    Photo by: Raymond Goodman

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  Architect Chad Everhart discovered a decaying farmhouse outside of Boone remnant of the Depression-era. Cardboard, used as insulation, was stuffed between the walls and the frame was literally falling apart at the seams. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.  Courtesy of: Courtesy Chad Everhart Architect

    Architect Chad Everhart discovered a decaying farmhouse outside of Boone remnant of the Depression-era. Cardboard, used as insulation, was stuffed between the walls and the frame was literally falling apart at the seams. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.

    Courtesy of: Courtesy Chad Everhart Architect

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  Everhart collaborated with students from nearby Appalachian State University to rebuild the home using leftover materials for a total renovation cost of $159,000 which includes a Blue Ridge Mountain essential: the front porch. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.

    Everhart collaborated with students from nearby Appalachian State University to rebuild the home using leftover materials for a total renovation cost of $159,000 which includes a Blue Ridge Mountain essential: the front porch. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.

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  Deep in a South Carolina marsh lies a home surrounded by a 5,000-acre nature preserve. Built by architect James Choate, the home features weathered fieldstone, cedar and copper that will evolve into a patina over time. Modern architecture is rare in this part of the state. "To put a contemporary house in the Lowcountry is a real shocker," says Choate. Photo by Phillip Spears.

    Deep in a South Carolina marsh lies a home surrounded by a 5,000-acre nature preserve. Built by architect James Choate, the home features weathered fieldstone, cedar and copper that will evolve into a patina over time. Modern architecture is rare in this part of the state. "To put a contemporary house in the Lowcountry is a real shocker," says Choate. Photo by Phillip Spears.

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  Also located in the historic South Carolina Lowcountry, this summer home pavilion, featuring a pool and an outdoor kitchen, was created by Stephen Yablon Architect. Photo by Michael Moran.  Courtesy of: Michael Moran

    Also located in the historic South Carolina Lowcountry, this summer home pavilion, featuring a pool and an outdoor kitchen, was created by Stephen Yablon Architect. Photo by Michael Moran.

    Courtesy of: Michael Moran

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  Since functionality was important to the design, the architect added hurricane windows and a tropical hardwood that is resistant to humidity, as well as stilts that can protect the home in the event of a flood. Photo by Michael Moran.  Courtesy of: Michael Moran

    Since functionality was important to the design, the architect added hurricane windows and a tropical hardwood that is resistant to humidity, as well as stilts that can protect the home in the event of a flood. Photo by Michael Moran.

    Courtesy of: Michael Moran

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