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Modern Australian Homes Part Three

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We top off our series of modern Australian homes with four more from the Dwell archives. If you missed parts one and two, be sure to check them out!
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   The James-Robertson house is composed of three separate structures perched in trees overlooking Australia's Pittwater Bay. With a bird's-eye view of its surroundings, smooth wood floors, and open decks that integrate common rooms with the outdoors, the home combines luxury with a natural experience. Photo by Richard Powers.  Photo by: Richard Powers

     

    The James-Robertson house is composed of three separate structures perched in trees overlooking Australia's Pittwater Bay. With a bird's-eye view of its surroundings, smooth wood floors, and open decks that integrate common rooms with the outdoors, the home combines luxury with a natural experience. Photo by Richard Powers.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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   While designing their Brisbane home, the Dillons aimed "to strike the right updated-mid-century-modern balance." Once they found an exterior style that suited them, the family proceeded to design their home's interior based on their love of Japanese design and passion for art collecting. Photo by David Sandison.  Photo by: David Sandison

     

    While designing their Brisbane home, the Dillons aimed "to strike the right updated-mid-century-modern balance." Once they found an exterior style that suited them, the family proceeded to design their home's interior based on their love of Japanese design and passion for art collecting. Photo by David Sandison.

    Photo by: David Sandison

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   The misconception that prefabricated housing isn't customizable is debunked with the perfect counterexample of this prefab home in the Australian outback on Dangar Island. The separate components of a largely self-sufficient home were assembled quickly and easily; the main rooms of the house are elevated on tall stilts that prevent any damage to the island's indigenous plant life. Photo by Patrick Bingham Hall.  Photo by: Patrick Bingham Hall

     

    The misconception that prefabricated housing isn't customizable is debunked with the perfect counterexample of this prefab home in the Australian outback on Dangar Island. The separate components of a largely self-sufficient home were assembled quickly and easily; the main rooms of the house are elevated on tall stilts that prevent any damage to the island's indigenous plant life. Photo by Patrick Bingham Hall.

    Photo by: Patrick Bingham Hall

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   Dave Clayden's glass-walled bedroom pushes boundaries in conservative Brisbane; his modern home's large windows and open layout are unusual in such a traditional area. Photo by Richard Powers.  Photo by: Richard Powers

     

    Dave Clayden's glass-walled bedroom pushes boundaries in conservative Brisbane; his modern home's large windows and open layout are unusual in such a traditional area. Photo by Richard Powers.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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