written by:
December 17, 2013
We add four more breathtaking structures to our collection of modern Australian homes from the Dwell archives. Be sure to take a look at parts one, two and, three as well!
Street view of profile house.

To shield an addition and new courtyard for a bungalow in greater Melbourne, architect Anthony Clarke fitted its facade with strips of rough-sawn Victorian ash. The new Victorian ash siding keeps the interior courtyard cool. Photo by Peter Bennetts.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Modern Australian Bungalow with a Victorian Ash Facade
1 / 8
The Half Full table and bench by Ross Gardam

The Half Full table and bench are by Ross Gardam. Photo by Peter Bennetts.

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Originally appeared in Modern Australian Bungalow with a Victorian Ash Facade
2 / 8
Design Files open house Dulux paint gray wood beams living room

We get a peek at the color-happy, Lucy Feagins-designed The Design Files Open House in Sydney, Australia. The built-in storage bench under the stairs is clad in wood paneling painted with Companion by Dulux. Photo by Phu Tang.

Originally appeared in Tour Modern, Colorful Design Files Show House in Sydney
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Design Files living room Loom rug flowers interior design

The other side of the living room opens onto a light-filled entryway. Flowers by Lisa Cooper; rug by Loom. Photo by Phu Tang.

Originally appeared in Tour Modern, Colorful Design Files Show House in Sydney
4 / 8
suspended home extension in australia

Architect Chris Knapp of Built-Environment Practice designed and completed construction of the Dragonfly within six months. Photo by Owen McGoldrick.

Courtesy of 
Owen McGoldrick
Originally appeared in A Suspended Home Extension in Australia
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suspended home extension in australia

This project engages the occupant in a dialogue between extensive views of the Pacific Ocean and Lennox Head, in contrast with immediate snapshots of the rocky hillside on which the project is grounded,” Knapp says. Photo by Owen McGoldrick.

Courtesy of 
Owen McGoldrick
Originally appeared in A Suspended Home Extension in Australia
6 / 8
modern house in australia with corrugated metal cladding

Australian firm Carterwilliamson Architects converted a 19th-century cow shed into a residence that implements passive heating and cooling principles. "Our clients share a vision for gregarious family life which is reflected in their home. The spaces are truly ‘open plan. Each room is connected to the others and to the sunny, green courtyard that acts as a natural extension of the living spaces," says firm principal Shaun Carter. Photo by Brett Boardman.

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Originally appeared in A Renovated House in Australia
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Clerestory window in a modern renovation near Sydney, Australia

A band of clerestory windows illuminates the interior. The walls are recycled brick, whose thermal mass insulates the house. "One of the most challenging aspects of the build was negotiating a tight budget; however it was also one of the most exciting aspects and led in part to the refined palette of raw materials which give the home so much of its character and echo the pastural vernacular of the old cow shed," says Carter. Photo by Brett Boardman.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in A Renovated House in Australia
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Street view of profile house.

To shield an addition and new courtyard for a bungalow in greater Melbourne, architect Anthony Clarke fitted its facade with strips of rough-sawn Victorian ash. The new Victorian ash siding keeps the interior courtyard cool. Photo by Peter Bennetts.

Photo by Peter Bennetts.

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