Minimal Home on a Narrow Plot in Japan

written by:
June 18, 2014
A Japanese architect creates multi-use miracles with a home just wider than a big rig. Read Full Article
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  Imai House by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
The narrow profile of this home covers just over 750 square feet, but still manages to provide an airy environment.
Photo provided by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
    Imai House by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

    The narrow profile of this home covers just over 750 square feet, but still manages to provide an airy environment.

    Photo provided by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

  • 
  Imai House by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
Sasaki realized that with limited floor space, he couldn’t be bound by assigned roles for each room. He concentrated on airy, open, and overlapping environments.
Photo provided by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
    Imai House by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

    Sasaki realized that with limited floor space, he couldn’t be bound by assigned roles for each room. He concentrated on airy, open, and overlapping environments.

    Photo provided by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

  • 
  Imai House by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
“These windows were positioned in front of the children’s bedroom to give them their own personal scenery,” says Sasaki. 
Photo provided by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
    Imai House by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

    “These windows were positioned in front of the children’s bedroom to give them their own personal scenery,” says Sasaki.

    Photo provided by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

  • 
  Imai House by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
Sasaki also loosened up the potentially confining space with an excess of natural light. High windows in the main living area bath the space in natural illumination, while the staggered series of smaller windows in the children’s rooms function like portholes.  
Photo provided by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
    Imai House by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

    Sasaki also loosened up the potentially confining space with an excess of natural light. High windows in the main living area bath the space in natural illumination, while the staggered series of smaller windows in the children’s rooms function like portholes.

    Photo provided by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

  • 
  Imai House by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
 Incorporating outdoor areas, such as the ground floor terrace, and playing with alternating room heights (the living room is nearly three times higher than the bedrooms) provided character and definition in what otherwise could have been a series of boxy spaces resembling Tetris pieces.
Photo provided by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
    Imai House by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

    Incorporating outdoor areas, such as the ground floor terrace, and playing with alternating room heights (the living room is nearly three times higher than the bedrooms) provided character and definition in what otherwise could have been a series of boxy spaces resembling Tetris pieces.

    Photo provided by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

  • 
  Imai House by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
When architect Katsutoshi Sasaki was presented with the challenge of carving out a home for a two-child family in what was ostensibly leftover land, he pivoted. Instead of focusing on the three meter width, he played with length and height to create a light-filled, wood-clad home that used its inherent limitations to its advantages. 
Photo provided by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
    Imai House by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

    When architect Katsutoshi Sasaki was presented with the challenge of carving out a home for a two-child family in what was ostensibly leftover land, he pivoted. Instead of focusing on the three meter width, he played with length and height to create a light-filled, wood-clad home that used its inherent limitations to its advantages.

    Photo provided by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

  • 
  Imai House by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
After the six-month project, Sasaki received the highest compliment possible; the family told him the space energized the children and brought the family together. While it’s not exactly a yard with a white picket fence, the re-imagined space gave the family room to expand. 
Photo provided by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
    Imai House by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

    After the six-month project, Sasaki received the highest compliment possible; the family told him the space energized the children and brought the family together. While it’s not exactly a yard with a white picket fence, the re-imagined space gave the family room to expand.

    Photo provided by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

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