A Look Inside 7 Venice Beach Homes

written by:
December 2, 2013
Often, the interiors of houses in Venice, California, are as free-spirited as the exteriors. Here are 7 from our archives that will remind you to embrace your inner bohemian.
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  It's hard to tell where the interiors stop and the exteriors begin in Dwell Home Venice, designed by Sebastian Mariscal around a series of established trees on the site. Photo by Coral von Zumwalt.   Courtesy of: Coral von Zumwalt

    It's hard to tell where the interiors stop and the exteriors begin in Dwell Home Venice, designed by Sebastian Mariscal around a series of established trees on the site. Photo by Coral von Zumwalt. 

    Courtesy of: Coral von Zumwalt

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  Right next door to Dwell Home Venice is a house designed by Modal Design principal Daniel Monti. Tasked with creating a low-maintenance, multi-generational home for his parents, his family, his brother’s children and their many pets, Monti looked to a massive century-old stone pine tree with a vast canopy growing right on the property as an endless source of inspiration. 

Despite the challenges the tree’s location presented, Monti never considered removing it from its native Venice, California, location. Showcasing his mastery of light, Monti designed these Cor-ten curtains to modulate the light that enters the home, creating a dappled effect all throughout the house. “Light is such a great resource in California and architects tend to lose that when they look into a space,” says Monti. Photo by Benny Chan.   Photo by: Benny Chan

    Right next door to Dwell Home Venice is a house designed by Modal Design principal Daniel Monti. Tasked with creating a low-maintenance, multi-generational home for his parents, his family, his brother’s children and their many pets, Monti looked to a massive century-old stone pine tree with a vast canopy growing right on the property as an endless source of inspiration. 

Despite the challenges the tree’s location presented, Monti never considered removing it from its native Venice, California, location. Showcasing his mastery of light, Monti designed these Cor-ten curtains to modulate the light that enters the home, creating a dappled effect all throughout the house. “Light is such a great resource in California and architects tend to lose that when they look into a space,” says Monti. Photo by Benny Chan. 

    Photo by: Benny Chan

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  Designer Jennifer Siegal’s own house is a modest 1920s Spanish bungalow on the leeward side of busy Lincoln Boulevard in Venice, California, that looks nothing like what she makes at her day job. A little bit homely, a little bit avant-garde, it’s a place to try out ideas, test products, and show off to potential clients and give them a feel for how she might make their own new house work. If they don’t grok Siegal’s crunchy-granola-meets-industrial vibe, then maybe they should just move on. The nonprefab place where architect Jennifer Siegel lays her head is a perpetual work in progress. Photo by Dave Lauridsen.   Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

    Designer Jennifer Siegal’s own house is a modest 1920s Spanish bungalow on the leeward side of busy Lincoln Boulevard in Venice, California, that looks nothing like what she makes at her day job. A little bit homely, a little bit avant-garde, it’s a place to try out ideas, test products, and show off to potential clients and give them a feel for how she might make their own new house work. If they don’t grok Siegal’s crunchy-granola-meets-industrial vibe, then maybe they should just move on. The nonprefab place where architect Jennifer Siegel lays her head is a perpetual work in progress. Photo by Dave Lauridsen. 

    Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

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  In the house built by her architect husband Lorcan O’Herlihy, Irish-born actress Cornelia Hayes-O’Herlihy gazes across the Venetian roofscape. Her cozy glass enclosure rests atop the new home designed by her husband. Photo by Misha Gravenor.   Photo by: Misha Gravenor

    In the house built by her architect husband Lorcan O’Herlihy, Irish-born actress Cornelia Hayes-O’Herlihy gazes across the Venetian roofscape. Her cozy glass enclosure rests atop the new home designed by her husband. Photo by Misha Gravenor. 

    Photo by: Misha Gravenor

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  It's not officially a home, but it feels like one: In an industrial loft just off Rose Avenue in Venice Beach—where creative shops, innovative restaurants, juice bars and trendy yoga studios abound—is a co-working space called Number Five. On the lower level of the space, Swedish designer Arne Norell’s "Ari" chair, designed in 1966, can be found on one of the common areas. Photo by Yardwork Co. 

    It's not officially a home, but it feels like one: In an industrial loft just off Rose Avenue in Venice Beach—where creative shops, innovative restaurants, juice bars and trendy yoga studios abound—is a co-working space called Number Five. On the lower level of the space, Swedish designer Arne Norell’s "Ari" chair, designed in 1966, can be found on one of the common areas. Photo by Yardwork Co. 

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  After living in what was once a poky little Venice, California, bungalow for nearly 20 years, married architects Frank Clementi and Julie Smith-Clementi of the Los Angeles-firm Rios Clementi Hale Studios created an arresting addition. In the master bedroom the Fireplace is by Fireorb, the rocking chairs are by Ray and Charles Eames for Herman Miller, and the bed and bedside table are custom designs by the owners. Photo by Undine Pröhl.   Photo by: Undine Pröhl

    After living in what was once a poky little Venice, California, bungalow for nearly 20 years, married architects Frank Clementi and Julie Smith-Clementi of the Los Angeles-firm Rios Clementi Hale Studios created an arresting addition. In the master bedroom the Fireplace is by Fireorb, the rocking chairs are by Ray and Charles Eames for Herman Miller, and the bed and bedside table are custom designs by the owners. Photo by Undine Pröhl. 

    Photo by: Undine Pröhl

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  It was the surf and the artsy vibe that attracted Eric Grunbaum to Venice Beach, California, 18 years ago. An avid surfer and creative director for an advertising agency, he thrives on lively environs. So it’s no surprise that he turned to the Los Angeles–based architect Barbara Bestor to design a house for him near the Pacific.Bestor, the chair of graduate studies at Woodbury University School of Architecture, has a formidable reputation in Southern California for her bohemian modernism, and for Grunbaum, she created a 2,000–square-foot, three-bedroom, three-bath home that harbors a traditional sensibility with a contemporary heart. Grunbaum gives us the tour of his modern surf shack.A music and cycling fan (the vintage bike is by Vivalo), Grunbaum mans the turntables while friends gather in the kitchen. Case Study barstools are from Modernica. Photo by Ye Rin Mok. 

    It was the surf and the artsy vibe that attracted Eric Grunbaum to Venice Beach, California, 18 years ago. An avid surfer and creative director for an advertising agency, he thrives on lively environs. So it’s no surprise that he turned to the Los Angeles–based architect Barbara Bestor to design a house for him near the Pacific.

    Bestor, the chair of graduate studies at Woodbury University School of Architecture, has a formidable reputation in Southern California for her bohemian modernism, and for Grunbaum, she created a 2,000–square-foot, three-bedroom, three-bath home that harbors a traditional sensibility with a contemporary heart. Grunbaum gives us the tour of his modern surf shack.

    A music and cycling fan (the vintage bike is by Vivalo), Grunbaum mans the turntables while friends gather in the kitchen. Case Study barstools are from Modernica. Photo by Ye Rin Mok. 

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