Imaginative Round Homes

August 14, 2014
Who says a home has to consist of straight lines? These dwellings forsake the strict geometry of conventional residential architecture, relying instead on curves for a more free-spirited living experience.
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  Buckminster Fuller’s Dymaxion House, first completed in 1930 and redesigned in 1945, was an early attempt to develop autonomous architecture. Never produced industrially, the prototypes nonetheless paved the way for the future of non-rectilinear residential building.

    Buckminster Fuller’s Dymaxion House, first completed in 1930 and redesigned in 1945, was an early attempt to develop autonomous architecture. Never produced industrially, the prototypes nonetheless paved the way for the future of non-rectilinear residential building.

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  Finnish architect Matti Suuronen took a stab at pod-like housing with the Futuro House, designed in 1968. The success of the project was thwarted by poor public reception, and fewer than 100 of the prefab structures were completed by the time the house was taken off the market in the mid 1970s.

    Finnish architect Matti Suuronen took a stab at pod-like housing with the Futuro House, designed in 1968. The success of the project was thwarted by poor public reception, and fewer than 100 of the prefab structures were completed by the time the house was taken off the market in the mid 1970s.

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  A cliffside residence built by John Lautner in 1968 is a clear departure from the rectilinear glass and steel architecture popular during the period. Commissioned by interior designer Arthur Elrod, the home’s circular concrete construction sets it apart from its neighbors.  Courtesy of: Photo by John Lautner

    A cliffside residence built by John Lautner in 1968 is a clear departure from the rectilinear glass and steel architecture popular during the period. Commissioned by interior designer Arthur Elrod, the home’s circular concrete construction sets it apart from its neighbors.

    Courtesy of: Photo by John Lautner

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  Also completed in 1968, Yrjö Kukkapuro’s studio-cum-residence consists of a rounded triangle topped with a sweeping concrete roofline. “It is a structure in waiting, prone to change as the landscape around it—not yet a form, rather a possibility,” Kukkapuro says.  Photo by: Johannes Romppanen

    Also completed in 1968, Yrjö Kukkapuro’s studio-cum-residence consists of a rounded triangle topped with a sweeping concrete roofline. “It is a structure in waiting, prone to change as the landscape around it—not yet a form, rather a possibility,” Kukkapuro says.

    Photo by: Johannes Romppanen

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  Dante Bini was the brains behind the Binishell, a 1960s innovation that involved inflating a large balloon coated with a thin layer of concrete that hardened in place to create a uniquely rounded edifice. Fifty years later, his son, Nicoló Bini, is adapting the concept for a new generation.  Courtesy of: Binisystems

    Dante Bini was the brains behind the Binishell, a 1960s innovation that involved inflating a large balloon coated with a thin layer of concrete that hardened in place to create a uniquely rounded edifice. Fifty years later, his son, Nicoló Bini, is adapting the concept for a new generation.

    Courtesy of: Binisystems

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  This water tower, known as the Chateau d'eau from Steenokerzeel, was built in 1941 in a city northeast of Brussels. An inspired renovation has since transformed the concrete pillar into a six-story circular living space that rises high above the surrounding scenery.

    This water tower, known as the Chateau d'eau from Steenokerzeel, was built in 1941 in a city northeast of Brussels. An inspired renovation has since transformed the concrete pillar into a six-story circular living space that rises high above the surrounding scenery.

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  Originally built in the 1980s by architect Ray Kappe, the Manhattan Beach home of Matt Jacobson and Kristopher Dukes is anchored by a sweeping circular gesture.  Photo by: Misha GravenorCourtesy of: Misha Gravenor

    Originally built in the 1980s by architect Ray Kappe, the Manhattan Beach home of Matt Jacobson and Kristopher Dukes is anchored by a sweeping circular gesture.

    Photo by: Misha Gravenor

    Courtesy of: Misha Gravenor

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  A69 Architects created an unconventional home in an architecturally conservative neighborhood of Prague. The poured concrete roof features a large ovoid cutout, which dictates the curved glass walls and playful interior spaces of the house below.  Photo by: Jens Passoth

    A69 Architects created an unconventional home in an architecturally conservative neighborhood of Prague. The poured concrete roof features a large ovoid cutout, which dictates the curved glass walls and playful interior spaces of the house below.

    Photo by: Jens Passoth

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